Jessica Robinson

Inland Northwest Correspondent

Inland Northwest Correspondent Jessica Robinson reports from the Northwest News Network's bureau in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. From the politics of wolves to racial tolerance in small towns, Jessica covers the economic, demographic and environmental trends that are shaping communities east of the Cascades.

Prior to joining the Northwest News Network team, Jessica was the news director of Jefferson Public Radio in Ashland, Oregon, where she produced a newsmagazine on Northern California and Southern Oregon. In 2010, she took a year to study Spanish in central Mexico and reported for an English–language newspaper in San Miguel de Allende. Jessica's stories for radio and print have earned awards from the Associated Press, the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association, and Public Radio News Directors Inc.

A Northwest native, Jessica grew up in an off–the–grid log cabin in the Columbia River Gorge. These days, when she's not agonizing over the perfect piece of tape, Jessica enjoys camping and hiking, amateur photography, and learning the etymology of words.

Pages

NW Firefighter's Death
5:25 pm
Tue February 12, 2013

Feds Issue Citations On Northwest Firefighter’s Death

Anne Veseth
Credit Northwest News Network

A federal investigation into a firefighter's death last year in Idaho finds hazardous conditions that could have been prevented. The Occupational Health and Safety Administration, or OSHA , faults both the Forest Service and the private Clearwater-Potlatch Timber Protective Association for a number of workplace safety violations.

Read more
Hispanic Health
6:32 pm
Wed February 6, 2013

Report: Idaho Latinos Face Disparities In Weight, Health Care

A new report finds Latinos in Idaho are struggling with many of the same health problems as the rest of the state’s population, but to an even worse extent. The wide-ranging demographic study is intended to guide policymakers on issues that affect Hispanics.

Read more
U.S. Citizenship
5:01 pm
Tue February 5, 2013

Northwest Immigrants Take The Oath Of Citizenship

Jessica Robinson Northwest News Network

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 4:53 pm

SPOKANE, Wash. - As Congress prepares for a debate over immigration reform, one group of immigrants in the Northwest quietly completed their paths to citizenship Tuesday. Fourteen people became U.S. citizens at a ceremony in Spokane, Wash.

One of them was Mukti Ryan. She wanted to be able to travel more easily with her American husband and daughter, even though she had to give up her Indian citizenship.

“India doesn't allow dual citizenship, so I can't call myself an Indian citizen anymore," Ryan says. "It's a bittersweet feeling.”

Read more
Big Game Hunting
5:52 pm
Mon February 4, 2013

Study: Big Game Is Getting Smaller

Theodore Roosevelt in his buckskin hunting suit around 1885.
Credit Library of Congress

If Teddy Roosevelt were to go big game hunting today, he might bring home slightly less-impressive trophies. That's because, according to a new analysis, the horns and antlers of North American wildlife have shrunk over the last century.

Read more
Greenhouse Gas Emissions
5:26 pm
Thu January 31, 2013

Gonzaga University Pledges Zero Emissions As 'Moral Imperative'

Brian Henning is a philosophy professor at Gonzaga and co-chairs the school’s Advisory Council on Stewardship and Sustainability.
Credit Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

Leaders at Gonzaga University are asking "What Would Jesus Do" about climate change? The Jesuit school has adopted a plan for zero greenhouse gas emissions by the year 2050.

Read more
Cursive Handwriting
4:41 pm
Tue January 29, 2013

Do We Still Need To Learn Cursive?

The most famous version of the Declaration of Independence was inscribed by the fine hand of clerk Timothy Matlack.
National Archives

Cursive handwriting may soon go the way of the card catalog and the film projector. Schools are moving to new curriculum standards that put more emphasis on typing skills. But not everyone is ready for the cursive alphabet to become a relic. The Idaho legislature is considering a statewide cursive mandate.

Read more
NPR Story
4:35 pm
Tue January 29, 2013

Do We Still Need To Learn Cursive?

National Archives

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 4:30 pm

Cursive handwriting may soon go the way of the card catalog and the film projector. Schools are moving to new curriculum standards that put more emphasis on typing skills. But not everyone is ready for the cursive alphabet become a relic. The Idaho legislature is considering a statewide cursive mandate.

As far as state representative Linden Bateman is concerned, losing cursive would amount to the dumbing down of society. That's why the Republican from Idaho Falls has introduced a bill to require cursive in elementary schools.

Read more
Private Prisons
6:07 pm
Mon January 28, 2013

Study: Private Prisons Lead To Fewer Jobs

Google Maps

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 5:45 pm

Researchers say the economic benefits of prisons often don't materialize for rural communities. That's according to a new paper by Northwest sociologists. In fact, they found communities with private prisons fare worse than they did before.

Washington State University sociologist Gregory Hook says rural areas that opt to build prisons, even courting them with tax breaks, have one main goal in mind: jobs.

“You know, you look across the way and you say 'Oh there's a prison. Fifty people have a job there. So that's 50 new jobs in my community.' … Only it's not.”

Read more
Silver Mining
5:38 pm
Fri January 25, 2013

Silver Boom Brings Historic Sunshine Mine Back Online

Miners begin work at the Sunshine Mine in 1972. The Mine is about 8 miles east of Kellogg, Idaho.
Credit MSHA

The high price of silver is bringing one of the Northwest's oldest silver mines back online. The Sunshine Mine in north Idaho is known for one of the worst mining disasters in the nation’s history. It will resume production in late 2014.

Read more
Wolf Recovery
6:40 pm
Wed January 23, 2013

Bill To Move Wolves West No Joke For Conservationists

A male wolf from Washington's Smackout Pack.
Credit Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife

This week, a Republican lawmaker who represents eastern Washington ranch country introduced what many see as a poke in the eye for his colleagues who support wolf recovery. The new bill would move wolves to the west side of the Cascades. The proposal was immediately taken as a joke. But some conservationists say moving wolves west is not a bad idea.

Read more

Pages