Gillian Coldsnow

Program Director

Gillian Coldsnow traces her radio  roots back to her early days in Singapore.  Shortly after graduation from the National University of Singapore, where she majored in English and Philosophy, Gillian began working for the Singapore Broadcasting Corporation as a classical music host and producer.  She started the country’s first classical music magazine program for children. Along the way she picked up several awards including a special commendation from the Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union.

Gillian moved to the U.S. in 1987, first to Tillamook on the scenic Oregon coast where she hosted the morning show at KTIL-FM and AM, which had a mix of pop, big band music and news with a very strong focus on community. In 1993, she moved to Pullman to become Northwest Public Radio’s classical music host in the afternoon. In 1997, she became the Operations and Traffic Manager, then hosted Morning Edition for eight and a half years. She became Assistant Manager of Programming and Operations in 2008, before taking her current position.

She says it is a joy to provide exceptional programming for NWPR’s listeners, and believes public radio employees go to work with a strong sense of mission.  “We are paid for our minds,” she likes to say, “but we give our hearts for free.”  Gillian’s other joys come from her children, opera, cooking and travel, and her work as Board Vice President of the Kenworthy Performing Arts Center in Moscow.

Ways to Connect

Soccer fans may not immediately bring images of classical music to mind, but for a sixth time Placido Domingo will sing before the World Cup final. He made the announcement that he will perform at Rio de Janeiro's HSBC Arena on July 11.

From The Top

“His hands were moving so fast, all I could see was a blur,” said Judy of 15-year old pianist Derek Wang of Needham, Massachusetts. And Richard, speaking of 15-year old cellist Jeremy Tai’s arrangement of a piece for his cello quartet, declared it “absolutely brilliant!”

THANK YOU FOR YOUR PLEDGE! Twelve and a half  hours – that’s all the time it took to reach the Super Thursday goal of 2,000 pledges!

The transmitter serving Wenatchee and Ellensburg on 90.7 is running at low power and the signal is very weak. As it serves as the audio source of KHNW 88.3 in Chelan/Waterville/Manson, that signal is also compromised.

Engineers are unable to access KNWR to investigate and fix this problem, because the road tothe transmitter site is impassable due to deep snow and ice. They're keeping a close eye on temperatures, and as soon as warmer temperatures allow access, they are ready to take the snow cat up the mountain.

Hitchster /

Asphalt: It’s everywhere and it’s expensive.  And its production is tough on air quality.  But a researcher at Washington State University may have a better way: asphalt made from waste cooking oil. "Rock Doc"  Kirsten Peters explains.

Dr. Haifang Wen grew up in a rural area of Shandong province, in eastern China. In his youth there were not many paved highways in the Chinese countryside.

“Lots of the roads were gravel,” he told me recently. “They were muddy when it rained. I remember riding a cow on them, or going along in a wagon pulled by a donkey.”

Young classical musicans: send in your audition tape now! Submissions are due at the end of the month.  

Northwest Public Radio is seeking applications from young musicians across the region to be on the April 24 show, at the Rialto Theater in Tacoma, sponsored in part by Ted Brown Music and the Broadway Center For The Performing Arts.

With listener feedback as our guide to this year’s program changes, some new and exciting programs have joined the Sunday lineup on the NPR News service, while reducing the number of repeat broadcasts.

Northwest Public Radio is now in the jazz business, with a third program stream airing on its newest station, KJEM.  (LISTEN). Click here for current on-air playlist.

A signal receiver has failed again, leaving the Bellingham translator unable to broadcast a clean feed of the NPR News service. We are working with the manufacturer to get a replacement as soon as possible, but briefly, 104.7 will air the NPR and Classical Music service instead.

We are deeply disappointed in the repeated equipment problems associated with this translator, and apologize for any inconvenience.

During this period, you can listen to the NPR News service on this page.  

UPDATE: The NPR News service translator in Ellensburg at 89.9 FM was back on the air on Wednesday evening.