Emily Schwing

INLAND NORTHWEST CORRESPONDENT

Emily Schwing comes to the Inland Northwest by way of Alaska, where she covered social and environmental issues with an Arctic spin as well as natural resource development, wildlife management and Alaska Native issues for nearly a decade. Her work has been heard on National Public Radio’s programs like “Morning Edition” and “All things Considered.” She has also filed for Public Radio International’s “The World,” American Public Media’s “Marketplace,” and various programs produced by the BBC and the CBC. She has also filed stories for Scientific American, Al Jazeera America and Arctic Deeply.

Emily got her start in radio as an intern at KUER-FM 90 in Salt Lake City, Utah. She also pursued internship opportunities at National Public Radio and Deutsche Welle Radio in Bonn, Germany. After graduating with a Geology degree from Carleton College in Northfield Minnesota, she went on to study Natural Resource Management at the graduate level at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

When she is not chasing down quirky news stories, you can find her off the beaten path skiing, biking or running in the backcountry with her long-time canine companion, Ghost. Emily also has 300 hours’ worth of certified interdisciplinary training in Hatha Yoga from the Nosara Yoga Institute in Costa Rica.

U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

 

President-elect Donald Trump has apparently passed over Cathy McMorris Rodgers as his pick for Interior Secretary. The Washington state congresswoman posted a vague statement on her Facebook page Tuesday afternoon.

Associated Press / AP Images

Northwest tribes continue to show support for the Standing Rock Sioux Indians and their opposition to the Dakota Access Pipeline. Over the weekend, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville delivered hand-smoked salmon and firewood to North Dakota. 

United States Fish and Wildlife Service

In the past month, wildlife officials have shot six wolves from a helicopter in the Colville National Forest  of northeast Washington state. That’s likely to come up during a two-day work session for members of Washington state’s Wolf Advisory Group that begins today. 

USGS

Fire officials are battling a major wildfire on the Spokane Indian Reservation. The wildfire spread rapidly onto tribal land, but response hasn’t kept up with the pace of the blaze.

Inciweb

Washington Governor Jay Inslee was in Spokane Tuesday to meet with officials battling two wildfires north and south of the city. He also paid a visit to a handful of displaced barnyard animals.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee Tuesday declared a state of emergency in 20 counties mostly on the dry side of the Cascades, an area vulnerable to wildfire. Resources are stretched thin in the battle to save homes and property.

Zack W / Flickr

On a near-daily basis, oil trains pass through the heart of Spokane past two major hospitals, a handful of schools and across an aquifer that serves nearly half a million people.

Spokane’s City Council Monday voted on a November ballot initiative that would make the shipment of oil or coal by rail through the city a civil infraction. If it passes, every rail car carrying oil or uncovered coal will generate a $261 fine.

Tami A. Heilemann / Department of the Interior

There’s been a lot of political buzz this week at the mid-year conference of the National Congress of American Indians in Spokane. Tribal leaders say the next President must understand the importance of tribal sovereignty.

The National Park Service Wednesday announced it will allow Native Americans to gather plants on federal land managed by the agency.

Ken Lund / Flickr

Groundwater in parts of the Columbia River Basin is declining. That’s one result from an analysis of long-term water supply and demand in Eastern Washington.

The limbs of Central Washington’s cherry trees are heavy with ripe fruit. In Moxee, crews are scrambling to bring in a harvest while the skies are clear and the weather is dry.

A day after tribal leaders and Governors in all 50 states received a letter from the Bureau of Indian Affairs, US Interior Secretary Sally Jewell paid a visit to the Spokane Indian Tribe.

Washington Department of Ecology / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Crews worked through the weekend to offload oil from tanker cars and remove damaged train cars by flatbed trucks following Friday’s train derailment in the Columbia River Gorge. The water treatment and sewer system in Mosier was damaged as a result of the accident.

Dr. Ron Hardy, University of Idaho Aquaculture Research Institute / Northwest News Network

They’re billed as vegan rainbow trout, but their new menu, developed by the University of Idaho’s Director of Aquaculture Research, Ron Hardy includes a little fish oil. So more accurately, you might call these fish pescatarians.

In Paris Monday, an auction of 400 artifacts included a pair of leggings that could have been worn by a woman from the Nez Perce Tribe of northern Idaho in the 1890s. Questions about whether many of the items had been acquired legally nearly halted the auction.

Dozens of people drove hundreds of miles from Wyoming, Montana and Idaho to Spokane Thursday to weigh in on a proposed coal export terminal. The terminal would sit along the Columbia River in Longview. But the permitting agencies want input from inland cities along the train tracks.