Corinna Nicolaou

An academic overachiever since failing the fifth grade, Corinna Nicolaou is a former policy writer for the U.S. Congress. After the humiliation of being held back in school, she went on to graduate Phi Beta Kappa from U.C. Berkeley and earn two Master’s Degrees—all in an effort to prove to herself that she could do it.

Growing up, she experienced a myriad of life situations: a girlhood living with her single mom in Austin and Dallas; teen years in the wilds of Los Angeles reunited with her father; and, finally, a determined young woman trying to make it on her own in Washington, D.C.

In 2005, Corinna did a scary thing: she got married, left her big job in the city, and moved to a small town in the Pacific Northwest. She hopes her stories will encourage listeners to reflect on the beauty of their own life adventures.

Her writing has appeared in the Washington Post, Texas Observer, and Narrative Magazine among other publications, and can be heard on All Things Considered on Northwest Public Radio.

Ways To Connect

Corinna Nicolaou

If you're looking for a pet, you may be considering adopting one from your local animal shelter. When Northwest Public Radio’s commentator, Corinna Nicolaou decided to get a dog, she did just that. She was hoping for instant love, but discovered something more complicated.  
 

  Growing up, NWPR commentator Corinna Nicolaou loved CB radio. She and her childhood friend loved to pretend they were truckers driving across the country. But when she finally took a cross-country trip with that friend, she learned what it takes to earn your CB handle.

May is Motorcycle Safety Month, and you'll hear how NWPR commentator Corinna Nicolaou got her first motorbike at 11. But Corinna learned that wearing a helmet doesn't keep you from getting hurt.

Regrets

Sep 14, 2012

You know that saying, “No regrets?” It seems like a good way to live. But  NWPR commentator Corinna Nicolaou, says it’s not for her. She would rather keep all those regrets close by.

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog.

Corinna Nicolaou / Northwest Public Radio

When you were a kid, did you sneak candies and hide the wrappers so your parents wouldn't find the evidence? Commentator Corinna Nicolaou did too. As we head into the 4th of July weekend here's a story of rebellion, and the sweet land of liberty, as a child sees it.

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog

Photo credit: Corinna Nicolaou / Northwest Public Radio

In today's economy, many Americans have to get by on less.  That means learning new strategies for saving money and living without.  NWPR commentator Corinna Nicolaou talks about growing up poor, and the ways in which wealth may really be a state of mind.

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog

I Feel Better Now

Feb 7, 2012
Corinna Nicolaou / Northwest Public Radio

We all have our failures, the things we regret… and maybe don’t want anyone to know about. 

Northwest Public Radio commentator Corinna Nicolaou  talks about failing in her youth, and how that failure drove her to succeed.
 

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog

Corinna Nicolaou / Northwest Public Radio

Facing the prospect of a turkey-less Thanksgiving?  Northwest Public Radio commentator Corinna Nicolaou was too when she became a vegetarian. She wondered how the meal could be delicious without meat infused gravy. Then she discovered the secret: vegetarian doesn't have to mean healthy...

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog

Corinna Nicolaou / Northwest Public Radio

Imagine that one of your earliest childhood memories is of blood, screaming, and chainsaws. That’s the case for commentator Corinna Nicolaou as she remembers a massacre!

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog

Corinna Nicolaou / Northwest Public Radio

Corinna shares how she didn't get her name. Her original name, that is.  A name inspired by the 60s and space... a name her father loved, but was convinced by his mother that the name needed to come down to earth.

You can read more of Corinna's commentary at her blog

Pages