Brett Charvat

Morning Edition Host & Producer

A native of Illinois, Brett Charvat grew up in western Montana and attended Montana State University, where he received a B.A. in acting. After graduation, he traveled to Japan, where he spent the next four years teaching English to children. Upon his return to the United States, he served as a Trooper with the Montana Highway Patrol for several years before relocating to the state of Washington, where his wife works as a post-doctoral research associate for Washington State University.

When he’s not on the air, Brett enjoys competitive shooting sports, hiking, camping, martial arts, traveling, and collecting antique pocket watches.

Brett began his work as an announcer with Northwest Public Radio in the fall of 2012, and he hopes to someday achieve his dream of becoming a professional voice actor.

Ways to Connect

Esther Louie

Bernie Sanders took 78 percent of the vote in last night’s Idaho Democratic caucuses. A record setting 24 thousand people voted, according to the state Democratic Party. 

Will Ryan / NPR

Terry Gross has interviewed writers, politicians, scientists, musicians, scholars...and architects, engineers, philosophers, journalists - it seems there is no end to the scope of her interests. In an interview with the New York Times, Gross talked about how she approaches interviews, known for their honesty and intimacy.

CREDIT CHRIS LEHMAN / NORTHWEST NEWS NETWORK

With the surge in wildfires this year, firefighters are facing a new challenge; interference from drones. 

Unmanned, remote-controlled aircraft are being flown near active wildfires.  The safety issues they cause can keep aircraft grounded—and keep them from the frequently critical task of dropping retardant. 

“Flying a drone near a wildfire is putting someone else’s life in danger, whether it be firefighters on the ground, pilots in the air…your drone hobby is not worth someone else’s life…”

Stuart Rankin / Flickr

Battling wildfire is not cheap and there’s little incentive to lower costs by changing how wildfires are managed. That’s the conclusion of WSU economist and professor Jonathan Yoder.

In a recent paper published in the Journal of Forestry, he and co-author Dean Lueck of the University of Arizona reported that part of the problem comes from inefficiencies in fighting fires. Those include the practice of dropping fire suppressant from the air – something which costs a lot of money but isn’t very effective.

StoryCorps

Ralph Olson was one of the early pioneers in the hop industry in and around Yakima. In this week’s StoryCorps Northwest, he talks with his friend Jeff Winn about his lifelong career with this important crop.

Copyright 2013 Northwest Public Radio 

StoryCorps

Many people across the world report experiences they've had when time slows down or they see a tunnel of bright light. These visions tend to accompany near death experiences. This week on StoryCorps Northwest Leo Figgs shares with you his own near death experience and the tragic suicide of his son, Isaac.

Copyright 2013 Northwest Public Radio 

StoryCorps

Harriet Davis was born in the early part of the 20th century in Minnesota. From an early age Harriet was raised to be confident and strong. This week on StoryCorps Northwest Harriet shares a couple of stories from her rough-and-tumble childhood and her journey to the Pacific Northwest.

Copyright 2013 Northwest Public Radio 

StoryCorps

  Garrett Scott grew up in the deep south at a time when segregation was the law of the land. Due to his friendships with African Americans Garrett decided to join the March for Freedom in Washington DC where Dr. Martin Luther King made his famous speech. In this week’s StoryCorps Northwest, he describes his experience to his daughter Sarah. Please be advised that the following interview contains a racial slur that some listeners may find offensive.

Copyright 2013 Northwest Public Radio 

What does your name mean to you? For teacher Jennie Honanie, having an Indian name reminds her of how easily the Yakima Sahaptin language is being forgotten. Jennie joined us at the StoryCorps mobile recording booth to explain the importance of the language, culture and family that have driven her to continue to share her cultural traditions with the youth of the Yakima Valley.

Copyright 2013 Northwest Public Radio

StoryCorps

Margaret Keyes Hakel is 102 years old, and remembers a lot about the history of the Yakima Valley. She told her friend Ardith Carratt about her childhood memories of her first school in Moxee, Washington, going to Washington State College, and her 102nd birthday celebration, in which she gave advice on how to die.

Copyright 2013 Northwest Public Radio 

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