Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Names, addresses and phone numbers of some 22,000 ISIS recruits — and information about the network that recruited them — are reportedly part of a trove of data that Sky News says it received from a former member of the extremist group.

The identities of people from more than 50 countries, including Britain, European nations, the U.S. and Canada, are purportedly in the data, which Sky says it has shared with government authorities.

Despite controlling Myanmar's newly sworn-in parliament, the party led by Aung San Suu Kyi can't name her as a presidential candidate because she's ineligible under constitutional rules. Conceding that point Thursday, Suu Kyi wrote an apology to her supporters.

In the first of a series of games pitting Google's AI computer against a human world champion in the ancient game of Go, Google DeepMind's AlphaGo program has narrowly taken Round 1 from Lee Sedol.

Bernie Sanders pulled off an upset in Michigan on Tuesday, beating Hillary Clinton in an important state where he had trailed in recent polls. Clinton handily took Mississippi, with more than 80 percent of the vote. On the Republican side, Donald Trump racked up three more victories, and Ted Cruz won in Idaho.

One month after the Department of Justice sued the city of Ferguson, Mo., for changing the terms of a consent decree to overhaul Ferguson's police and legal system, the city's mayor says it's time to accept the original agreement.

The boy who narrowly missed being hit in the face by a wayward baseball bat has explained why he was distracted at the game: He was sending a photo of the game to his mom and sister. And he says his first pro baseball game was "amazing."

Nearly three years after she survived a serious injury in the Boston Marathon bombing, college student Victoria McGrath has died in Dubai, the victim of a car crash that also killed three others — including a classmate of McGrath's from Northeastern University.

Both McGrath, 23, and her classmate Priscilla Perez Torres, 23, were set to graduate this spring. The close friends had been traveling together in Dubai.

Announcing a "tragedy in our community," Northeastern University President Joseph Aoun released a statement about the pair's deaths:

In a decision that triggers hundreds of millions of dollars' worth of payments to consumers, the Supreme Court on Monday denied Apple's request to hear its appeal of a lower court's ruling that the tech company had illegally fixed prices with publishers of e-books.

"The Justice Department says today's decision means Apple's liability in the price fixing case is settled once and for all," NPR's Lynn Neary reports. "The Supreme Court let stand a $450 million settlement reached in a lower court in 2014."

Attorneys representing seven families who've been affected by lead-poisoned water in Flint, Mich., filed a lawsuit Monday that cites federal environmental laws and seeks class-action status for what they call wide-reaching negligence.

Attorney Hunter Shkolnik says the court papers were filed Monday morning, and that the suit eventually could include the estimated 8,000 young people who may have been exposed to lead-tinged water in Flint. The suit cites the Safe Drinking Water Act and other federal laws, Shkolnik says.

The best play at this weekend's spring training game between the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Atlanta Braves didn't take place on the field — it was in the stands, where a man's fast reflexes saved a young fan from being hit in the face after a bat hurtled into the stands.

In an instant that's frozen in time, the barrel of the bat looms just inches away from the boy's nose and eyes, with the man's hand and forearm blocking its path.

Pages