Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

A discussion on Capitol Hill about concussion research brought a startling moment Monday, as an NFL executive acknowledged for the first time that football has been linked to a degenerative brain disease.

Jeff Miller, the NFL's executive vice president for health and safety, admitted the connection when he was asked about research by Boston University neuropathologist Dr. Ann McKee, who has reported finding signs of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in the brains of 90 out of 94 former pro football players — and 45 out of 55 former college players.

A mated pair of bald eagles that have nested in the U.S. National Arboretum since 2014 are now starting a family, taking turns incubating two eggs — and one of them could hatch sometime Tuesday. Two webcams are currently trained on their nest in Washington, D.C.

You can watch the webcam online — we'll note that the American Eagle Foundation warns, "This is a wild eagle nest and anything can happen."

Making official what was set in motion back in December, Pope Francis has approved the canonization of five new saints, including Mother Teresa. Hundreds of Mother Teresa's followers are expected to visit Rome when she's canonized on Sept. 4.

In addition to Mother Teresa, who was famously a tireless advocate for the poor, Francis approved final canonization plans for four other saints Tuesday. Here are there names, along with the Vatican's brief description of their lives and their canonization date:

For the third year in a row, Dallas Seavey is the first musher to reach Nome, Alaska, winning his fourth Iditarod championship overall. Seavey had been the first to reach the race's final checkpoints, ahead of his father, Mitch – another previous champion.

Seavey's team of seven dogs averaged nearly 9.5 miles an hour on the 1,000-mile journey, according to the Iditarod competition tracking website.

Saying her employer had failed to stand by her after she alleged being assaulted by Donald Trump's campaign manager, reporter Michelle Fields has resigned from conservative website Breitbart News. Editor-at-large Ben Shapiro also resigned.

"I can't stand with an organization that won't stand by me," Fields tweeted this morning.

Apollo Global Management says it's buying specialty grocery store chain Fresh Market Inc. for $1.36 billion in a deal that adds a premium of more than 20 percent to Fresh Market's closing stock price last week.

Based in Greensboro, N.C., the Fresh Market company was founded by Ray Berry; he and his son Brett together own nearly 10 percent of the company.

From a statement by Apollo Global Management:

After Amtrak's Southwest Chief train derailed just west of Dodge City, Kan., shortly after midnight Monday, in an incident that sent some 32 people to hospitals, investigators are focusing on a possible problem with the track. The train was carrying 131 passengers and a crew of 14, Amtrak says.

Earl Weener of the National Transportation Safety Board says there is an indication there was some misalignment in the rails.

After media reports charged massive overspending and waste by the Wounded Warrior Project, the organization's board of directors fired its CEO and chief operation officer Thursday. The charity has received hundreds of millions of dollars in yearly donations.

A former Russian press minister and aide to President Vladimir Putin who was found dead in a Washington, D.C., hotel last November died from blunt force injuries, according to a report from the chief medical examiner's office.

It's the first time an official cause of death for Mikhail Lesin has been announced in the case. When Lesin died four months ago, Russian media outlets reported that the cause was a heart attack, citing family members.

For the second time in as many days, Go champion Lee Sedol fished out one of the playing stones he'd captured from his opponent and placed it back on the board, admitting defeat against the computer program AlphaGo, which now has a 2-0 lead in their best-of-five series.

Pages