Austin Jenkins

Olympia Correspondent

Since January 2004, Austin Jenkins has been the Olympia-based political reporter for the Northwest News Network. In that position, Austin covers Northwest politics and public policy as well as the Washington State legislature. You can also see Austin on television as host of TVW's (the C-SPAN of Washington State) Emmy-nominated public affairs program "Inside Olympia."

Prior to joining the Northwest News Network, Austin worked as a television reporter in Seattle, Portland and Boise. Austin is a graduate of Garfield High School in Seattle and Connecticut College in New London, Connecticut. Austin’s reporting has been recognized with awards from the Association of Capitol Reporters and Editors, Public Radio News Directors Incorporated and the Society of Professional Journalists.

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One day after the state got a favorable revenue forecast, Washington Governor Jay Inslee said he no longer believes the $1.4 billion tax package he proposed in December is necessary.

Marijuana sales and a recovering housing market should help boost Washington tax collections by more than $300 million over the next two years.

Washington’s 30-day special session is more than half over and there is still no sign of a budget deal.

Mentally ill inmates continue to languish in Washington jails despite a recent federal judge’s ruling that the practice is unconstitutional.

It’s been nearly two years since Joel Reuter fired a pistol from his condo balcony and was shot to death by Seattle police. Thursday, Governor Jay Inslee signed “Joel’s Law.”

By 2018, the state of Washington should have a treasure trove of data on the cost and quality of health care.

Washington lawmakers are taking heat for an 11 percent pay raise they didn’t ask for.

Washington Speaker of the House Frank Chopp said “now is not the time” to try to impeach indicted State Auditor Troy Kelley and that it would be a distraction.

Why would someone who had been accused of financial misdeeds run for political office? That’s a recurring question in the case of indicted Washington State Auditor Troy Kelley.

The first-term Democrat is accused of corrupt business practices and tax evasion -- allegations that have dogged him since before he ran for statewide office.

Now, Kelley has pleaded not guilty to federal charges and is on leave.

An impressive résumé

Washington State Auditor Troy Kelley was elected to root out waste and fraud in state and local government. Now, the first-term Democrat faces federal charges that he defrauded escrow company customers and the IRS.

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