Anjuli Dodhia

Classical Music Host

Hailing from Bellevue WA, Anjuli Dodhia was immersed in classical music at a young age. She sang in her church youth choir, and in senior year of high school, she was the orchestra’s principal violinist.

When Anjuli began studying Zoology in college, she realized she couldn’t live without making music, so changed majors. In her music studies at Shoreline Community College, Anjuli discovered her passion for opera in particular. The first opera she saw was Bellini’s I Puritani at the Seattle Opera in 2009 – and she promptly fell in love with the bel canto style of singing. She gained a healthy appreciation for 20th Century music when she saw Bartok’s Bluebeard’s Castle and Schoenberg’s Erwartung.

Anjuli began working at Northwest Public Radio as the music librarian in 2012 while studying and receiving vocal training at Washington State University. She is an active member of the music community, performing with the Idaho Bach Festival, the Regional Theater of the Palouse and the Palouse Choral Society. In her free time, Anjuli can be found practicing her arias, indulging in fantasy literature, or enjoying her favorite TV shows, including Sherlock and Doctor Who.

Ways to Connect

Music is a combination of sound and silence - a concept that composer and pianist Haskell Small has explored extensively in his performances and in his own music. As he prepares to perform in the Northwest November 10 and 11, Anjuli Dodhia sat down with Haskell Small to chat about silence, sound, contemplation and his programs in Seattle and Wenatchee.

Anjuli Dodhia: Thank you so much, Haskell Small for being here and speaking with us today.

Super Thursday brought you three musical montages of piano, choral and opera hits. If you missed them, you can listen below and find information on playlists! 

Piano Concerto Montage - Created by Jessie Jacobs

Sergei Rachmaninoff 

Concerto No. 2: I.

Van Cliburn, piano/ RCA Symphony Orchestra, Kiril Kondrashin

RCA 5912

Peter Tchaikovsky

Piano Concerto No. 1: I. 

Van Cliburn, piano/ Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Fritz Reiner

RCA 5912

WikiCommons

The obvious real-life romance in the classical world is Robert Schumann and Clara Wieck, so for a change of pace I will talk about Harriet Smithson and Hector Berlioz.

Harriet was an Anglo-Irish actress. In one performance of Hamlet and Romeo and Juliet in 1827​, in which Harriet played the leading ladies, Berlioz happened to be in attendance. He immediately fell in love with the beautiful and talented actress.