Amelia Templeton

A group of Lane County residents has formed an unusual partnership to test streams for chemicals. The residents are worried that herbicides sprayed onto clear-cut forests are drifting into nearby waters. Amelia Templeton of Earthfix reports.

Photo by Amelia Templeton / Earthfix

Hunters once killed nearly all the greater sandhill cranes in Oregon and Washington. But the local crane population has made a comeback. In June, in the mountain lakes of the Cascades, you might hear a pair defending its nest. Amelia Templeton reports.

Most sandhill crane chicks hatch in May. If you get too close to a nest, mom and dad will throw back their heads and beat their wings. This pair is nesting near Howard Prairie Lake, in the Cascades. The adults are grey, with red caps. And they’re about the size and weight of a sixth grader.

Gold mining with small dredges is popular in the rural Northwest. Today, the 9th circuit court ruled that the Forest Service has to strengthen its regulation of this kind of mining in salmon streams. Amelia Templeton of Earthfix reports.

Photo by Amelia Templeton / Northwest News Network

The Supreme Court is being advised not to take on a controversial logging pollution lawsuit that began in Oregon. Amelia Templeton explains.

A California American Indian tribe Tuesday asked federal regulators to order the removal of four dams on the Klamath River. The tribe says a restoration plan for the river is stalled. Amelia Templeton reports.

The illegal trade of wildlife is big business- worth an estimated $5 billion a year, and growing. But who do you call to investigate a crime when the victim is an elephant, or a butterfly?

Turns out, there’s only one forensics team in the world that can handle crimes involving thousands of rare and endangered species. The team works at the U.S Fish and Wildlife Forensics Lab in Ashland, Oregon. The lab isn’t open to the public. But reporter Amelia Templeton got a glimpse inside.

The bureau of reclamation is predicting a water shortage in Oregon’s Klamath basin. The federal water agency has asked Klamath farmers to consider idling their land. Amelia Templeton reports.

Astronomy buffs in the western U.S. were treated to an eclipse known as the Ring of Fire over the weekend. Technically, it's an annular solar eclipse, during which time the moon passes between the earth and sun. The moon blocks out much of the sun's light and casts a giant shadow on the earth.

For the first time since 1994, a partial solar eclipse will be visible across the Northwest. The eclipse will reach its peak at about 6:20 Sunday night. Amelia Templeton reports on how to watch the event safely.

A former government scientist says the Department of Interior has painted too positive a picture of Klamath Dam removal. Paul Houser was a scientific integrity officer. And he says he was fired for expressing his dissent. Amelia Templeton reports.

Wind farms along the Columbia River were asked to shut down for about 10 hours over the weekend. For the second year in a row, spring rain and snowmelt have led to an oversupply of hydropower on the Columbia River. Amelia Templeton reports.

Forest Service officials in northeast Oregon have announced they will put on hold a plan to close forest roads. Amelia Templeton reports.

The plan was to go into effect this summer. It would have made about half the roads in the Wallowa-Whitman forest off limits to cars and off road vehicles. The goals: protect habitat and create a more efficient road network. But local residents protested.

Mac Huff is a fishing guide in Joseph, Ore. He says closing the roads would create problems for hunters. And make it harder for him to find fuel for his wood stove.

The Port of Coos Bay is negotiating with three companies interested in building a coal export facility on Oregon’s South Coast. Through interviews and records requests, EarthFix has learned the identities of two companies involved in the deal. Amelia Templeton reports.

Coos Bay is one of six ports in the northwest pursuing a deal to build a coal export terminal. The coal would come from mines in Montana and Wyoming. If the companies reach a deal with the port, it won’t be the first time coal is big business on Oregon’s south coast.

Photo credit: D. Gordon E. Robertson / Wikimedia Commons

MEDFORD, Ore. -- Researchers say they have learned why invasive barred owls are thriving while native spotted owl populations are slowly disappearing.

The barred owl and the spotted owl are like a pair of siblings. They’re closely related species, and they compete over everything. They compete over the best trees to roost in. And for the best food source too, juicy flying squirrels. But barred owls are less picky. And that gives them an edge.

COOS BAY, Ore. -- An engineering study found that a rail line between Coos Bay and Eugene needs about $100 million worth of work before it can handle heavier train traffic. The study was paid for by anonymous investors interested in exporting coal from Coos Bay. Amelia Templeton reports.

The Port of Coos Bay bought the line in 2009, after it was shut down by a Florida company.

It’s been back in service for less than a year, moving small amounts of freight for sawmills and timber companies.

ASTORIA, Ore. -- Changes are afoot at a liquefied natural gas project near Astoria. Amelia Templeton reports.

COOS BAY, Ore. -- Federal regulators visited the site of a proposed liquefied natural gas facility near Coos Bay, Oregon Wednesday. Regulators say the Jordan Cove energy project will need to submit a new application now that it is proposing to export natural gas instead of importing it. Amelia Templeton reports.

Photo by Amelia Templeton / Northwest News Network

CHILOQUIN, Ore. -- You won’t find Lost River suckerfish on any menus in the Northwest. But for years, this fish was a staple for the tribes living in Southern Oregon. Now the fishery is in trouble, and the Klamath tribes are trying to figure out how to bring it back. Amelia Templeton reports.

Photo by Amelia Templeton / Northwest News Network

KLAMATH FALLS, Wash. -- The Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuge is a key rest stop for more than a million migrating spring birds. But the refuge is also a hotspot for avian cholera. Amelia Templeton reports.

Photo Source: Washington State Department of Transportation

CENTRAL POINT, Ore. -- It’s getting easier to take an electric car on a Northwest road-trip. As Amelia Templeton reports, I-5 is going electric.

There’s a Chevron station just off of I-5 in Central Point, Oregon. You can buy gas here. Its more than 4 dollars a gallon. Or you can plug in an electric car for free, and charge it in about 20 minutes. The Oregon Department of Transportation has just opened 8 charging stations like this one in Southern Oregon.

Neal Appleton brought his Nissan Leaf.

Photo by Amelia Templeton / Northwest News Network

SALEM, Ore. -- Congress may be close to funding county timber payments for one more year. The senate passed a transportation bill Wednesday that included an extension of the rural aid program.

SALEM, Ore. -- Oregon lawmakers have passed legislation to help six southern Oregon counties that are near insolvency. The bill allows the counties to dip into money currently socked away in road maintenance funds. Amelia Templeton reports.

Photo courtesy U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

MEDFORD, Ore. -- The US fish and Wildlife service has proposed two new steps to help shrinking populations of the northern spotted owl. The agency may designate state and private land critical owl habitat. And it will kill barred owls. Amelia Templeton reports.

Photo courtesy U.S. Depatment of the Interior

MEDFORD, Oregon -- Secretary of Interior Ken Salazar was in Southern Oregon Tuesday. He’s asked the Bureau of Land Management to prepare five new logging projects in Oregon that have an environmental twist. Amelia Templeton reports.

Photo Credit: Amelia Templeton / Northwest News Network

MEDFORD, Ore. -- Representatives from the Northwest released not one, but two controversial forestry bills Thursday. Both would channel funds from timber sales to rural counties. Amelia Templeton reports.

Photo credit Wikimedia Commons

MT. HOOD, Ore. -- Researchers at Oregon State University think they have figured out why Mt. Hood doesn’t erupt with the same bang and violence as other Cascade volcanoes. Amelia Templeton reports.

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