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The Two-Way
4:11 am
Wed July 23, 2014

Gaza Conflict Day 16: Here's What You Need To Know

Smoke and fire rises over Gaza City on Tuesday. Israeli airstrikes pummeled a wide range of locations along the coastal area as diplomatic efforts intensified to end the two-week war.
Hatem Moussa AP

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 8:46 am

Amid another day of fighting, Secretary of State John Kerry landed in Tel Aviv on Wednesday and began a whirlwind session of shuttle diplomacy.

As NPR's Michele Kelemen, who is traveling with Kerry, tells our Newscast unit, the secretary of state is "trying to talk to everybody" to see if he can broker a cease-fire and perhaps lay the groundwork for longer-term negotiations over the future of Gaza.

The Israeli offensive against Hamas in the Gaza Strip is now entering its 16th day. Here's what you need to know:

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Health Care
3:10 am
Wed July 23, 2014

Conflicting Obamacare Rulings Set Stage For Supreme Court Face-Off

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 4:51 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Business
2:56 am
Wed July 23, 2014

5 Managers Detained In Shanghai Expired-Meat Scandal

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 4:51 am

Chinese regulators suspended operations at Shanghai Husi Food, owned by Illinois-based OSI group. State media reported that stale meat was packaged for sale under "tacit approval" of senior managers.

Health Care
2:31 am
Wed July 23, 2014

What Do The New Obamacare Rulings Mean For People Getting Subsidies?

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 4:51 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Business
2:31 am
Wed July 23, 2014

Atlantic City's Casino Crisis: A Cautionary Tale

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 4:51 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
2:30 am
Wed July 23, 2014

As Gaza Fighting Rages, West Bank Palestinians Can Only Watch

Palestinian Imad Abudayyah and his son, Ghassan, speak to relatives in the Gaza Strip via Skype from Ramallah in the West Bank. Israeli restrictions make it extremely difficult to travel between the two territories. West Bank Palestinians have largely been bystanders in the current round of fighting.
Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson NPR

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 11:31 am

At least three times a day, Imad Abudayyah, 49, fires up his laptop at the West Bank hotel where he's currently living with his 11-year-old son, Ghassan, to reach out to relatives in the Gaza Strip. Abudayyah says Skype is the only way they can see the family members they have left behind.

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Business
2:24 am
Wed July 23, 2014

Don't Make Me Come Back There: Toyota's New Parent-Friendly Options

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 4:51 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Strange News
2:19 am
Wed July 23, 2014

$500,000 Gets You A 170-Foot-Tall Ketchup Bottle In Illinois

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 4:51 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
1:45 am
Wed July 23, 2014

Airlines Cancel Service To Israel Amid Heightened Aviation Safety Concerns

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 4:51 am

A number of major airlines have suspended service to and from Tel Aviv as the fighting between Israel and Hamas in Gaza intensifies. That's leaving passengers to find other arrangements.

National Security
1:45 am
Wed July 23, 2014

The Challenge Of Keeping Tabs On The NSA's Secretive Work

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper (center), accompanied by FBI Director Robert Mueller (left) and CIA Director John Brennan, testifies on Capitol Hill on March 12, 2013. When questioned, Clapper said the NSA did not collect data on Americans. He later acknowledged his response was "clearly erroneous."
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Wed July 23, 2014 4:51 am

Here's a question with no easy answer: How do you hold the nation's spy agencies accountable — when they control the secrets?

Former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden apparently thought the answer was to blow the lid off some of the NSA's highly classified programs. He took documents and shared them with journalists.

But what about Congress? It's supposed to oversee the NSA — and other spy agencies. For the committees charged with that task, it hasn't been easy keeping tabs on the secretive world of federal surveillance.

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