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From Our Listeners
11:32 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Letters: 'Zuul The Terrordog' And New Graduates

NPR's Neal Conan reads from listener comments about previous shows including living with cancer, mainstreaming special education kids, and advice for new graduates. And "Zuul the Terrordog" sings along to the Talk of the Nation theme.

NPR Story
11:14 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Henry Louis Gates Jr.: A Life Spent Tracing Roots

Henry Louis Gates Jr. is also the author of The Signifying Monkey, which won the American Book Award.
Joseph Sinnott

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 9:07 am

For more than 30 years, Henry Louis Gates Jr. has been an influential public intellectual with a distinct style, who makes complex academic concepts accessible to a wider audience.

Gates — known widely as "Skip" — may be best known for his research tracing the family and genetic history of famous African-Americans. "There are just so many stories that are buried on family trees," Gates tells host Neal Conan. "My goal is to get everybody in America to do their family tree."

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Your Money
11:14 am
Tue May 8, 2012

'Sandwich Generation' Must Make Tough Choices

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 4:01 pm

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Over the past few weeks, our colleagues at MORNING EDITION have been telling a series of stories called "Family Matters," about the challenges that over 50 million of we Americans now face: multigenerational households, homes where two or more generations of adults live under one roof.

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National Security
11:14 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Busted Bomb Plot Advanced Underwear Scheme

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 11:30 am

FBI bomb experts continue to study the device involved in the latest al-Qaida plot to bring down a U.S.-bound airliner. U.S. officials say the explosive is a more advanced version of the underwear bomb that malfunctioned aboard a jet in 2009.

Race
11:13 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Why Does Diversity In Banking Matter?

Stuart Ishimaru heads the Office of Women and Minority Inclusion, at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.
AP

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 7:14 pm

May is Asian-American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month, and all month long, Tell Me More will be speaking with game changers who trace their heritage to that part of the world. They're people who have made a difference in politics, culture, science and sports.

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Shots - Health Blog
10:40 am
Tue May 8, 2012

When Religious Rules And Women's Health Collide

Hospital rules can affect a woman's options for care.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 1:18 pm

When you go to the hospital these days, chances are good that it will be affiliated with a religious organization. And while that may might just mean the chaplain will be of a specific denomination or some foods will be off limits, there may also be rules about the kind of care allowed.

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Planet Money
10:30 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Nobel Laureate: 'I've Been Wrong So Often, I Don't Find It Extraordinary At All'

"I'm 101 at the moment," Ronald Coase said.
University of Chicago

Originally published on Wed May 9, 2012 4:07 pm

I recently had a brief conversation with Ronald Coase.

"I'm 101 at the moment," he told me. "I get older by the minute."

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The Picture Show
10:07 am
Tue May 8, 2012

The Visual South, Part II: Photography Is Like Chicken

"Letter Never Sent" is Hamrick's most recent hand-bound series. "The viewer has an intimate relationship with the book by holding it, feeling its textures and turning its pages, instead of just standing across the room staring at it," he says.
Frank Hamrick

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 7:48 am

The current issue of Oxford American magazine, known as "the Southern magazine of good writing," is nicknamed the "Visual South Issue." In its 100 under 100 list, the magazine identifies "the most talented and thrilling up-and-coming artists in the South." This week, we'll take a look at five of the photographers on that list.

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Remembrances
9:41 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Sendak's Legacy: Helping Kids 'Survive Childhood'

Sendak talks with children about his book Where the Wild Things Are at the International Youth Library in Munich in June 1971.
Keystone/Hulton Archives Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 7:49 am

When author and illustrator Maurice Sendak entered the world of children's books, it was a very safe place. Stories were sweet and simple and set in a world without disorder. But Sendak, who died Tuesday at age 83, broke with that tradition. In Where the Wild Things Are, Sendak explored the darker side of childhood. Upstairs in young Max's bedroom, a jungle grows, and he sails off to a land of monsters.

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The Two-Way
9:24 am
Tue May 8, 2012

Albanian Who Tried To Help Bring Down Mobster Gets Asylum In U.S.

An Albanian man who more than a decade ago agreed to help the U.S. Justice build a case against a mobster accused of human smuggling has finally won his long-sought quest for asylum in the U.S.

Edmond Demiraj, his wife and adult son have been granted full asylum, NPR's Carrie Johnson reports.

As Carrie reported last year:

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