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Shots - Health Blog
12:21 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Will Medicaid Bring The Uninsured Out Of The Woodwork?

Texas Gov. Rick Perry is the latest state executive to say no to an expansion of Medicaid.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 12, 2012 1:54 pm

Ever since the Supreme Court decided last month that an expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act should be optional, quite a few Republican governors have been vowing to take a pass.

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The Salt
12:20 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Cool Down With A Hot Drink? It's Not As Crazy As You Think

Joe Palca serves up some hot tea on a very hot day at Teaism in Washington, D.C., last week.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 6:47 pm

Hot tea on a hot day? Not for me, thank you. Not my idea of how to cool down.

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World
12:19 am
Wed July 11, 2012

Venezuela Begins Debate On Future Without Chavez

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, seen speaking during a TV program in Caracas on June 15, will compete with former opposition governor Henrique Capriles and other candidates in October's presidential elections.
Juan Barreto AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 1:45 am

In Venezuela, people are beginning to talk about what was once unthinkable: Just who could succeed the all-powerful President Hugo Chavez?

He has been battling cancer, which for much of this year forced him to suspend his once-frequent TV appearances. On Monday, Chavez declared himself free of the cancer, though it's not the first time he's said he was cured.

For 13 years, he has consolidated his hold on power while nationalizing farmland and seizing private companies. And now, despite his infrequent appearances, he remains a political force.

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Sweetness And Light
7:03 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Going To The Game: The Price Is Wrong?

Andy Murray returns a shot during the men's final match at Wimbledon. A pair of tickets for the match went for £32,000 (about $50,000).
Paul Gilham Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 1:45 am

Sports is more ubiquitous than ever on television. And sports is almost the only thing that's left, live, on TV. NBC Universal is even going to let Americans see the Olympics live this year.

Nevertheless, despite TV's charm, last week as Andy Murray, Great Britain's homeboy, drew closer to making the Wimbledon final, the word was that tickets for actual Centre Court seats would be scalped for up to £32,000 a pair. If you're not hanging around the currency exchange market, that comes to something like $50,000. For two tickets. To a game.

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The Two-Way
4:05 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Report: Some Americans Have Lost Homes Over As Little As $400

Furniture and personal belongings sit in front of a house that appears to have been foreclosed on in Antioch, California.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 7:02 pm

A report from a consumer group released today says that vulnerable owners are losing their homes for owing as little as $400 in back taxes.

The AP reports:

"Outdated state laws allow big banks and other investors to reap windfall profits by buying the houses for a pittance and reselling them, the National Consumer Law Center said in a report being released Tuesday.

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Around the Nation
2:20 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Homeless Rural Vets Find A Place To Call Home

American Legion Post Cmdr. Mark Czmyr and his father, Navy veteran William Czmyr, originated the idea to create permanent apartments for homeless vets in Jewett City, Conn.
Lucy Nalpathanchil for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 4:34 pm

This month, more than a dozen homeless veterans will finally have a place to call their own, thanks to the American Legion.

The organization's post in a small Connecticut town has been working for a decade on a unique project to create not transitional but permanent supportive housing in their rural community.

For 55-year-old Army veteran Jeff MacDonald, the new facility in Jewett City, Conn., was like "winning the lottery."

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The Salt
2:15 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

A Second Helping Of Pie Week: How Pumpkin Pie Turned My Life Around

Pumpkin pie to the rescue?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 6:57 pm

Yes, we know, Pie Week is officially over, and we already commemorated your contributions to it with our Storify post on Friday. But one more irresistible pie story came across the transom that we just had to share.

So without further ado, here's NPR listener Marie Metivier-DeMasters' story about how pie changed her life, which we received by email and edited a bit for length and clarity:

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NewsPoet: Writing The Day In Verse
2:13 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

NewsPoet: Paisley Rekdal Writes The Day In Verse

Paisley Rekdal visits NPR headquarters in Washington on Tuesday.
Ebony Bailey NPR

Originally published on Wed July 25, 2012 11:10 am

Today at All Things Considered, we continue a project we're calling NewsPoet. Each month, we bring in a poet to spend time in the newsroom — and at the end of the day, to compose a poem reflecting on the day's stories.

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It's All Politics
2:09 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Intriguing Opportunity, But Some Risk For Romney In Speech To NAACP

A sign at the NAACP annual convention in Houston, where Mitt Romney is scheduled to speak on Wednesday.
Pat Sullivan AP

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 2:30 pm

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's planned speech Wednesday at the NAACP convention in Houston comes at a precarious time for the nation's African-American community.

-- The unemployment rate among blacks is north of 14 percent — more than 5 points higher than the national average.

-- Opponents of GOP-led efforts to require voters in about a dozen states to show identification say the voter ID laws could disproportionately disenfranchise legal black and Latino voters.

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The Two-Way
2:08 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Penn State Will Release Report On Sex-Abuse Scandal On Thursday

Former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky leaves the Centre County Courthouse in handcuffs after a jury found him guilty on 45 of 48 charges in his sex abuse trial in Bellefonte, Pa., Friday.
Rob Carr Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 5:49 am

This Thursday, Penn State University will release an independent report on the sex-abuse scandal that has rocked the institution and its football program.

After allegations of child abuse surfaced against Jerry Sandusky, the university appointed Judge Louis Freeh to look into how the university handled the case. The university and its leaders including former legendary football coach Joe Paterno have been criticized for what has been characterized as slow action.

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