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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
4:00 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

Who's Carl This Time?

Originally published on Sat August 11, 2012 8:07 am

Transcript

CARL KASELL: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell, and here's your host, at the Merrill Auditorium in Portland, Maine, Peter Sagal.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you. So much for the reserved New Englander thing. It's great to be here in Portland, which is the hipster capital of Maine.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: It's terrible now. The grizzled old lobstermen have to wear t-shirts saying, "My beard is not ironic."

(LAUGHTER)

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
4:00 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

Bluff The Listener

Originally published on Sat August 11, 2012 8:07 am

Transcript

CARL KASELL: From NPR and WBEZ-Chicago, this is WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!, the NPR News quiz. I'm Carl Kasell. We're playing his week with Roy Blount Jr., Amy Dickinson, and Tom Bodett. And, here again is your host, at the Merrill Auditorium in Portland, Maine, Peter Sagal.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Thank you, Carl.

(APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Thank you everybody. Right now, it's time for the WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME! Bluff the Listener game. Call 1-888-Wait-Wait to play our game on the air. Hi, you're on WAIT WAIT...DON'T TELL ME!.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
4:00 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

Opening Panel Round

Originally published on Sat August 11, 2012 8:07 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Right now, panel, time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Amy, scientists have discovered that just like Americans in the 50s, dinosaurs once experienced what?

AMY DICKINSON: Oh wow. Just like Americans in the 50s, dinosaurs once experienced. Making out in the rec room? No.

(LAUGHTER)

DICKINSON: That's not it.

SAGAL: What are you guys doing down there? Hunting for prey, mom. Nothing.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Actually, technically, for Americans it started right after World War II.

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The Torch
3:39 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

In World Record Time, Americans Take Gold In Women's 4X100 Relay

Carmelita Jeter of the United States receives the relay baton fom Bianca Knight of the United States on their way to winning gold in the Women's 4 x 100m Relay Final Friday.
Clive Brunskill Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 3:51 pm

Carmelita Jeter made sure everyone understood what Team USA had just accomplished. She pointed toward the digital clock with the baton as it flashed a time of 40.82 seconds.

Jeter, Tianna Madison, Allyson Felix and Bianca Knight had just gotten a gold medal in the 4 X 100m relay and they did so while shattering the world record by a little more than half a second.

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The Torch
2:57 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

Seeing The World Through The Olympic Rings [Infographic]

Artist Gustavo Sousa of Mother London depicts the world's population using only the five colorful rings from the Olympic logo rings.
Gustavo Sousa Screenshot from Oceaniaeuropeamericaasiaafrica

One of the most thought-provoking infographics of the Olympics has nothing to with sports at all.

Artist Gustavo Sousa of the group Mother London uses only the five rings of the Olympic logo to strip down global statistics and expose disparities across th world's continents.

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The Torch
2:47 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

Gaming The Games: The Rules That Got Bent In London

Cameron van der Burgh of South Africa celebrates his gold medal in the men's 100m breaststroke. He later admitted that he took extra dolphin kicks during his swim, a violation of the rules.
Adam Pretty Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 5:06 pm

The London Summer Olympics are winding down, and by most accounts, the games have been a success. There were plenty of "thrill of victory, agony of defeat" moments; big, enthusiastic crowds — although there were too many blocks of empty seats; and for those who like a helping of scandal served up at their Olympics, there was that, too.

It wasn't the usual scourge of doping. Instead, the London Olympics had incidents of bending the rules and ethics of sport.

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It's All Politics
2:30 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

The Next Act For Newt Gingrich? It Could Be A TV Talk Show

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, accompanied by his wife Callista, speaks at a rally in Montgomery, Ala., on March 7.
David Bundy AP

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 2:55 pm

After serving as speaker of the House, publishing several historical novels and running for president, what's next for Newt Gingrich?

One possible third act, Gingrich told NPR staffers on Friday, could be sharing a television studio with his wife, Callista.

"We're kind of intrigued with the idea of doing a daily show, which would change our lives pretty dramatically," Gingrich said. "But if we do it, we want it to be closer to Regis and Kathie Lee than to Bill O'Reilly or Hardball."

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It's All Politics
2:10 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

In New Ads Focused On Character, Obama And Romney Get Personal

Romney campaign ad

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 3:24 pm

The economy and jobs may be what voters say they're most concerned about.

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The Two-Way
2:01 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

Time, CNN Suspend Fareed Zakaria's Column, After Plagiarism Claim

Fareed Zakaria.
Emmanuel Dunande AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 13, 2012 3:58 am

A little more than a week after a major plagiarism scandal brought down science wunderkind Jonah Lehrer, Time magazine said it was suspending Fareed Zakaria's column for a month.

Zakaria is an influential and respected commentator on foreign policy and also hosts a show on CNN called Fareed Zakaria GPS.

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Remembrances
2:00 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

David Rakoff Saw The World In All Its Dark Beauty

David Rakoff, the author of Half Empty, Don't Get Too Comfortable and Fraud, was a frequent contributor to This American Life. He died Thursday at the age of 47.
Larry Busacca Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 10, 2012 4:04 pm

When writer David Rakoff died Thursday at the age 47, he was barely the age he said he was always "meant" to be. In his 2010 memoir, Half Empty, he wrote, "Everyone has an internal age, a time in life when one is, if not one's best, then at very least one's most authentic self. I always felt that my internal clock was calibrated somewhere between 47 and 53 years old."

Rakoff died in New York City after a long struggle with cancer — an ordeal that he wrote about with sobering honesty and biting wit.

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