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NPR Story
3:45 am
Sun October 14, 2012

Week In Sports: Big Surprises In Baseball Playoffs

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 11:14 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LIFE IS A BALL GAME")

SISTER WINONA CARR: Life is a ball game being played each day. Life is a ball game...

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Baseball playoffs moved into the league championships last night and the New York Yankees suffered a 6-4 loss. Yankees captain Derek Jeter suffered a broken ankle. NPR's Mike Pesca hasn't missed a minute of the postseason drama. He joins us now. Hey, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: There have been a lot of games. I think I'll cop to missing a couple of minutes but yeah, yeah.

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Election 2012
3:45 am
Sun October 14, 2012

Strict Private School Prepped Romney To 'Aim High'

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney lived in Stevens Hall while he was attending Cranbrook School in Bloomfield Hills, Mich.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 11:14 am

From now until November, President Barack Obama and GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney will emphasize their differences. But the two men's lives actually coincide in a striking number of ways. In this installment of NPR's "Parallel Lives" series, a look at Romney's time at Cranbrook, an all-boys prep school in Michigan.

Cranbrook has been coed since the mid-1980s, its overall diversity is quite evident and the dress code is casual. None of that was true when Mitt Romney, class of 1965, was a student there.

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History
3:45 am
Sun October 14, 2012

Lessons From The Cuban Missile Crisis

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 11:14 am

Fifty years ago, a United States Air Force U-2 spyplane captured photographic proof that the Soviet Union was installing offensive nuclear missile sites in Cuba, and a diplomatic standoff ensued. Weekend Edition host Rachel Martin talks with Graham Allison, director of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and professor at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government about the lessons learned from the Cuban Missile Crisis.

Sunday Puzzle
1:32 am
Sun October 14, 2012

Where, 'O' Where Shall I Put You?

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 11:14 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is a two-word phrase in which the letter "O" is added at the end of the first word to make the second word. For example, given the clue "pack animal owned by Thomas Jefferson's first vice president," the answer would be "Burr burro."

Last week's challenge: Draw a regular hexagon and connect every pair of vertices except one. The pair you don't connect are not on opposite sides of the hexagon but along a shorter diagonal. How many triangles of any size are in this figure?

Answer: 82 triangles

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Alt.Latino
11:03 pm
Sat October 13, 2012

What Two Songs Say About Argentine History

Argentine band Tremor adds a new twist to a traditional dance music known as malambo.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 11:19 am

A country's music can reveal a lot about its history. This week, Alt.Latino hosts Jasmine Garsd and Felix Contreras stop by Weekend Edition Sunday to offer two examples from Argentina.

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Sports
3:15 pm
Sat October 13, 2012

A Shifting Playing Field: Coming Out As A Gay Athlete

Boxer Orlando Cruz hits a speed bag at a public gym in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on Oct. 4. He said publicly that he is gay earlier this month.
Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo AP

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 8:07 am

These days, we're more likely to see professional athletes on products than protest lines. But it wasn't always this way. In the 1960s, sports stars were often as famous for what they believed as for their home runs.

Back then, many athletes spoke out about civil rights. Muhammad Ali was stripped of his heavyweight title and threatened with imprisonment for refusing to fight in Vietnam, on the grounds of racial discrimination.

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The Two-Way
2:41 pm
Sat October 13, 2012

Space Shuttle Endeavour's Final Journey Adds A Day

Space shuttle Endeavour travels through Los Angeles on Saturday.
Jeff Gritchen AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 7:22 am

Update 10/14/12 10:08 a.m. ET: The Excitement Has Passed, But Not The Shuttle

The crowds that cheered the shuttle on Saturday changed their tune after a night of hassles that left the Endeavour still blocking L.A. traffic and threatening trees early Sunday morning.

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Around the Nation
2:40 pm
Sat October 13, 2012

Detroit Snob? Of Course I Am.

Some Detroiters think their city has gotten a bad rap.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 12:22 pm

In the past few years, the news from Detroit has been fairly bleak so it's no surprise comedians like Stephen Colbert have taken shots at the downtrodden city.

"Maybe someone could attempt the unthinkable: walk through downtown Detroit."

But many positive changes are taking place. Desiree Cooper, who started a company called Detroit Snob, says residents have a lot to be snobby about.

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U.S.
2:01 pm
Sat October 13, 2012

Family Fights For Honor Of 'Rogue' Vietnam General

Gen. John D. Lavelle was accused of authorizing illegal bombing raids in North Vietnam. Stripped of two stars, he was forced into retirement in 1972.
AP

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 9:42 am

Gen. John D. Lavelle commanded the Seventh Air Force during the Vietnam War. He served five steps down the chain of command from President Nixon. In his oral history — recorded by an Air Force history officer in 1978 — he explained how, six years earlier, his life changed forever.

It started with a meeting with a Thai general, Dawee Chullasapya, who had charged Lavelle with overseeing an operation to destroy anti-aircraft guns in North Vietnam. It was a mission necessary to keep Thailand in the war.

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From Our Listeners
1:58 pm
Sat October 13, 2012

Three-Minute Fiction: 'A Day In The Sun'

Originally published on Sun October 14, 2012 8:07 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee, in for Guy Raz.

(SOUNDBITE OF CLOCK TICKING)

HEADLEE: You know what that means. It's time for Three-Minute Fiction, our contest where listeners come up with original stories in under 600 words. The challenge this round was to write a story that revolves around a U.S. president - fictional or real. Our judge, the writer Brad Meltzer, will be deciding the winner in just a few weeks. Until then, here's an excerpt from one standout story.

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