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9:54 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Sneak Preview: 5 Books To Look Forward To This Summer

Andrew Bannecker

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 7:28 am

My summer reading preferences are so particular they have, at times, stopped me from reading at all. I need a romance for a train trip — for obvious reasons. When it's hot, I prefer something with no climate congruence at all; I've never enjoyed Anna Karenina so much as I did on the beach (that romance is a train exception — er ... for obvious reasons). When I'm on a plane trip, I like a passel of good young-adult novels, filled with cliffhangers, reversals and quick emotion. It's a mood makeover in flight.

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The Two-Way
9:50 am
Mon June 10, 2013

For Bobby Fischer, WikiLeaks & NSA Leaker, Iceland Is Haven

Former world chess champion Bobby Fischer in March 2005 as he left Japan for Iceland, where he lived out his final years.
Yuriko Nakao Reuters /Landov

Edward Snowden, the former CIA and Booz Allen computer security technician who says he leaked information about National Security Agency surveillance programs, has told The Guardian that he wants "to seek asylum in a country with shared values

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NWPR Books
9:32 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Jeannette Walls' 'Silver Star' Lacks Spunk And Direction

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 5:11 am

"You've got spunk," Lou Grant says to Mary Richards on the very first episode of The Mary Tyler Moore Show. And then he adds, famously, "I hate spunk." The year is 1970, the same year in which Jeannette Walls set her new novel, The Silver Star. In the book, someone tells the 12-year-old narrator, Bean Holladay, that she's got spunk too. Maybe it's no coincidence. 1970, after all, was situated squarely in the middle of second-wave feminism. It was an era when women and girls were asserting themselves and finding their voices, which weren't always met with approval.

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NWPR Books
9:14 am
Mon June 10, 2013

In 'Shocked,' Patricia Volk Honors Two Formative Femmes

Elsa Luisa Maria Schiaparelli, seen here in 1947, rose to fashion stardom in the 1930s.
George Konig Getty Images

If you walked into New York's Morgen's Restaurant in the 1950s, you'd be greeted at the door by a perfectly dressed and powdered blonde who'd smilingly show you to your table and hand over a menu. That hostess, Audrey Elaine Morgen Volk, is at the center of her daughter Patricia Volk's new memoir, Shocked: My Mother, Schiaparelli, And Me. In it, Volk describes how two vivid women helped her move into adulthood: One was the iconoclastic Italian fashion designer Elsa Luisa Maria Schiaparelli; the other was her mother, a loving, difficult and icy stunner.

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Politics
8:29 am
Mon June 10, 2013

How Serious Is The NSA Data Leak?

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 12:56 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Economy
8:29 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Despite Images Of Affluence, LGBT Poverty High

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 12:56 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Here in the U.S., June is known as gay and lesbian pride month, recognizing the contributions and concerns of LGBT people in this country. Later, we'll talk with two people on the cutting edge of what's become one of the markers of LGBT progress. They are the authors of a new book about how to photograph same-sex weddings. There are some interesting similarities and differences that might surprise you.

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Shots - Health News
8:26 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Designated Drivers Often Fail To Abstain From Drinking

Has the person taking the car keys been drinking, too?
Jacom Stephens iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 5:45 am

We might need to change the definition of a designated driver from noble abstainer to something along the lines of not as drunk as you.

The idea of having one person in a group agree not to drink so that everyone else can get home safely after a night of alcohol-fueled fun has been promoted as a way to reduce the dangers of drunken driving, especially among teenagers and young adults.

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The Two-Way
7:32 am
Mon June 10, 2013

No Decisions Yet On The Most-Anticipated Supreme Court Cases

An artist's sketch of the scene during a U.S. Supreme Court hearing earlier this year.
Art Lien Reuters / Landov

There's no big news again today from the U.S. Supreme Court — which is sort-of big news in itself because it means we're still waiting for the justices' decisions on these major cases:

-- Fisher v. University of Texas, a key test of affirmative action in higher education.

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The Two-Way
6:59 am
Mon June 10, 2013

S&P Upgrades U.S. Credit Outlook To 'Stable'

Citing improved tax receipts and some steps taken to address the country's long-term budget issues, Standard & Poor's upgraded the United States credit outlook to "stable." As Reuters reports, the credit rating agency said the chance of a downgrade to the country's credit rating is "less than one in three."

Reuters reports:

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The Two-Way
6:32 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Daniel Ellsberg: NSA Leaker Showed Battlefield Courage

Daniel Ellsberg; Jan. 16, 2010.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 9:58 am

Daniel Ellsberg, who leaked the Pentagon Papers in 1971, says Edward Snowden, the man who leaked top secret documents about an NSA surveillance program, showed "the kind of courage that we expect of people on the battlefield."

Ellsberg, who became one of the first to be prosecuted under the 1917 Espionage Act, told CNN that if he had been in Snowden's position, he would have broken the law in an act of civil disobedience.

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