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Architecture
12:00 pm
Sun March 17, 2013

2013 Pritzker Winner Toyo Ito Finds Inspiration In Air, Wind And Water

Dome in Odate (multipurpose dome), Odate-shi, Akita, Japan
Mikio Kamaya Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 4:48 pm

Toyo Ito, a 71-year-old architect based in Japan, is the winner of the 2013 Pritzker Architecture Prize. The jury honored Ito for his more than four-decade career, in which he has created architecture that "projects an air of optimism, lightness and joy ... infused with both a sense of uniqueness and universality."

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NWPR Books
8:32 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Reminder: Our Memories Are Less Reliable Than We Think

Cover of Pieces of Light

What's your first memory? You're a baby or a toddler. Maybe it's a specific experience, maybe an impression. Maybe someone's face, or just a kind of feeling or sense. Or maybe it's a compilation of stories over years. And maybe it's less true than you think it is.

In his new book, Pieces of Light, Charles Fernyhough digs deep into the recesses of memory to figure out what shapes it, how it works and why some things stick with us forever. Fernyhough talks with NPR's Rachel Martin about his own first memory and his exploration of the science of remembering.

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NWPR Books
8:32 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Tsunami Delivers A Young Diarist's 'Tale' Of Bullying And Depression

A Tale for the Time Being presents the diary of a friendly, funny and strong-willed 16-year-old girl named Nao. Nao spent her formative years in California, but her family has returned to Japan, and when the book begins, she's living in Tokyo.

Nao tells readers right up front that her diary will be a log of her last few days on Earth: She plans to take her own life, and as the story goes on, readers learn why.

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The Two-Way
8:31 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Two Steubenville Football Players Found Guilty Of Rape

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 9:37 am

Two Ohio high school football players accused of raping a 16-year-old girl on an alcohol-fueled night last August have been found guilty and sentenced to jail.

On Sunday, the fifth day of trial in the Steubenville courtroom, Judge Thomas Lipps called the boys "delinquent" on all three counts against them – the juvenile court equivalent to a guilty verdict.

They were each charged with "digitally penetrating" the girl, which meets the state's definition of rape. One boy faced an additional count of distributing a nude photo of a minor.

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NWPR Books
7:32 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Hat-Maker Philip Treacy's Favorite Hat, And Many More

In the studio, Feb. 10, 1999
Kevin Davies Phaidon

In 2011, Irish milliner Philip Treacy made waves across the world when he designed 36 different hats for the royal wedding. Remember Princess Beatrice's unforgettable hat? Treacy made that.

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The Picture Show
7:20 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Fake It 'Til You Make It: What Came Before Photoshop

Leap into the Void, 1960 (Yves Klein, Harry Shunk and Jean Kender)
The Metropolitan Museum of Art Courtesy of the National Gallery of Art

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 4:48 pm

The term "Photoshopping" has these days become synonymous with photo manipulation. But the practice is much older than the computer software — about as old as photography itself.

An exhibition now on display at Washington, D.C.'s National Gallery of Art is exploring just that: The collaging, cutting, pasting and coloring that preceded digital photography.

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NPR Story
6:29 am
Sun March 17, 2013

The Beat Goes On: Titanic Band Leader's Violin Verified

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 8:32 am

An auction house in Britain announced this week it has authenticated a violin they believe belonged to Wallace Hartley, the band leader aboard the Titanic, who famously continued playing, even as the ship went down. Host Rachel Martin talks about the find and the seven-year process it took to authenticate it.

The Two-Way
2:56 am
Sun March 17, 2013

The War Creeps Closer To Damascus

The scene of a car bomb explosion near the headquarters of Syria's ruling Baath party, in the center of Damascus, on Feb. 21. While the city is not involved in the fighting on a daily basis, the war is edging closer to the capital.
Louai Beshara AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 8:59 am

Editor's Note: The author is a Syrian citizen living in Damascus and is not being further identified for safety concerns.

In Damascus, you can smell the scent of gunpowder that wafts in from shelling on the outskirts of the capital. You hear fighter jets buzzing above. Ambulance sirens wail throughout the day, and death notices are regularly plastered on city walls.

Damascus is not under direct bombardment, like many other places in Syria that have been ravaged by an uprising now two years old. But the war is creeping closer, and residents feel the heat.

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The Salt
2:55 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Yogurt For Men: A Review

That's pronounced "Man, Go!"
NPR

Originally published on Wed March 20, 2013 9:44 am

Last week on Wait, Wait... Don't Tell Me, we talked about a new yogurt for men, or brogurt, from a company called Powerful Yogurt. Here's what our panelist, comedian Jessi Klein, had to say about it:

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Middle East
2:52 am
Sun March 17, 2013

Fear And Daily Struggles: Reporter Reflects On Iraq War

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 8:32 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MARTIN: It was early 2003: Doctors reported the first known case of the SARS virus; the musical "Chicago" won the Oscar for Best Picture; and Dick Cheney, Condoleezza Rice and President George W. Bush made their case for war.

DICK CHENEY: There is no doubt that Saddam Hussein now has weapons of mass destruction.

CONDOLEEZZA RICE: We don't want the smoking gun to be a mushroom cloud.

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