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Author Interviews
5:34 am
Sun July 14, 2013

'This Town' Takes Aim At The Washington Establishment

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 9:12 am

Washington, D.C. gets a bad rap: politicians love to run against it, voters love to complain about it — but New York Times Magazine correspondent Mark Leibovich says he's actually an optimist about our nation's capital.

Leibovich's new book is This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral — plus plenty of valet parking! — In America's Gilded Capital. It's a lively account of the sometimes incestuous mix of media and politics in D.C., and unlike many books about politics, it doesn't have an index.

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Sunday Puzzle
5:34 am
Sun July 14, 2013

A Geography Quiz With A Spelling Twist

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 10:59 am

On-air challenge: You're given a series of clues, and every answer is the name of a U.S. state capital.

Last week's challenge: Rearrange the letters of INDIA and BELARUS to name two other countries. What are they?

Answer: Sudan, Liberia

Winner: Eddy Chandler of Piedmont, Calif.

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Music Interviews
5:34 am
Sun July 14, 2013

Frank Turner: A Punk Poet With A Confessional Streak

Frank Turner's new album is Tape Deck Heart.
Brantley Gutierrez Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 9:12 am

In a review for his last album, NME magazine described British singer-songwriter Frank Turner as "the people's prince of punk poetry." But Turner's lyrics can be quite personal as well. He's got a new album, released this spring, called Tape Deck Heart — and the lead single, "Recovery," is about as confessional as they come.

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Music Interviews
5:03 am
Sun July 14, 2013

Daughn Gibson: Story Songs Born Of An Odd-Job Life

Daughn Gibson's latest album is called Me Moan.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 8:39 pm

Daughn Gibson is kind of the heir to the Johnny Cash throne: a deep-voiced country singer whose songs are filled with characters of questionable morality — or just pure evil. He worked as a long-haul truck driver, a cashier in an "adult book store," a drummer in a metal band, and all sorts of other odd jobs before he became a bit of an indie music darling last year. NPR's Jacki Lyden spoke with Gibson about his new album, Me Moan; click the audio link to hear their conversation.

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NPR Story
4:35 am
Sun July 14, 2013

Jeter's Back ... Then Injured Again

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 9:12 am

Derek Jeter was back in the Yankees lineup last week after breaking his ankle in the 2012 playoffs. A few at-bats later, he was out with a strained quadricep. Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin talks with NPR's Mike Pesca about how much difference this one player can make on the baseball diamond.

NPR Story
4:35 am
Sun July 14, 2013

NAACP Calls For Federal Action

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 9:12 am

The NAACP is asking the Justice Department to file civil rights charges in the Zimmerman case. Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin talks with NAACP President and CEO Ben Jealous.

NPR Story
4:35 am
Sun July 14, 2013

British TV Broadcasts Muslim Call To Prayer

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 9:12 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The holy month of Ramadan began this past week, a time when Muslims around the world engage in a disciplined routine of fasting and prayer.

(SOUNDBITE OF CALL TO PRAYER)

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NWPR Books
3:00 am
Sun July 14, 2013

An Ancient Parchment Refuses To Give Up Its Secrets

William Friedman, who helped create the NSA and became its first chief cryptologist, declared the Voynich Manuscript impossible to translate. He thought it was an early example of a made-up language.
Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 10:47 am

It reads like a Dan Brown novel: An indecipherable, cryptic medieval text, shrouded in mystery, filled with entrancing images, disappears for hundreds of years and then suddenly resurfaces at an Italian castle.

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Parallels
2:22 am
Sun July 14, 2013

The Don Who's Taken Charge Of Jordan's Biggest Refugee Camp

Mohammed al Hariri is known as the mafia don of the Zaatari Refugee camp. He is the man who gets things done.
Peter Breslow/NPR

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 8:14 pm

In chaotic situations, certain people rise to the top, and that is certainly the case for Mohammed al-Hariri, a former air conditioning repairman who commands enormous deference on the windblown streets of Zaatari refugee camp.

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The Sunday Conversation
1:00 am
Sun July 14, 2013

Patrolling Border, Sheriff Sees Immigrants' 'Determination'

Tony Estrada is the sheriff of Santa Cruz County, Ariz.
Courtesy of Tony Estrada

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

Tony Estrada is the sheriff of Santa Cruz County, Ariz., the poorest of all the border counties in the U.S. There are more than 1,000 Border Patrol Agents stationed in the county, which shares some 50 miles of border with Mexico.

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