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Social Entrepreneurs: Taking On World Problems
2:22 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

An 'Entrepreneurial Seedling' Sprouts In Detroit

A worker with The Empowerment Plan creates a coat that will later be donated to a homeless person. The organization works inside Ponyride, a 30,000-square-foot warehouse near downtown Detroit. The warehouse hosts other local businesses, too.
Courtesy of Order & Other

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 2:42 pm

Detroit is littered with empty warehouses — more than 7,000, by one estimate. They've become skeletons of the city's industrial past.

But not this warehouse, where Jennifer Blake is feeding quilted fabric through a sewing machine. She's making a coat. Fashioned with Velcro fastenings, it has a sleeping bag that slips out on the bottom, and is made of recycled car parts, she says.

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Parallels
2:15 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

As Stigma Eases, Single Motherhood In Mexico Is On The Rise

Maria Carlotta Santa Maria is a single mother in Mexico and is the sole wage earner in her household. Women like her are becoming more common there, and the stigma once associated with having children out of wedlock is fading.
Carrie Kahn NPR

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 4:25 pm

On her daily route delivering laundry in her working-class neighborhood in southern Mexico City, Maria Carlotta Santa Maria, or Mari, as she is known, seems to know everyone: the mailman, the woman on the corner selling salty nuts, and her favorite greetings are for the guys at the corner gas station.

Mari is the kind of person that can make this inhospitable and overwhelming megacity seem almost small and friendly. But as a single mother, she says raising her 10-year-old daughter Jimena alone hasn't been easy.

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The Two-Way
2:15 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Card-Carrying Cajuns? Louisiana Lawmakers Weigh ID Change

Louisiana drivers would be able to add the message "I'm a Cajun" on their licenses, under a bill making its way through the statehouse. Here, shrimp fisherman Merlin Boudreaux holds up part of his catch in Morgan City, St. Mary Parish, La.
Sean Gardner Getty Images

A bill making its way through the Louisiana Legislature would let Cajun citizens celebrate their ancestry by customizing their driver's license, adding the phrase "I'm a Cajun" below their photograph.

It would cost $5 to add the message; the money would go toward "scholarships distributed by the Council for the Development of French in Louisiana, a program promoting French language and culture in the state," reports NOLA.com.

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Media
2:11 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Bloomberg News Apologizes For Tracking Subscribers

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 2:42 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The editor-in-chief of Bloomberg News is apologizing. That's after admitting his reporters tracked how subscribers use the company's famous financial data terminals. The disclosure has caused an uproar in the financial services world. As NPR's David Folkenflik reports, the episode has roots both in Bloomberg's innovations in data management, and its corporate culture.

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The Two-Way
1:33 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Western Retailers To Fund Upgrades At Bangladesh Factories

Relatives on Sunday attempt to identify the bodies of loved ones following from the collapse of Rana Plaza in Savar, on the outskirts of Dhaka.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 8:37 pm

Four retailers who represent the largest purchasers of clothes produced in Bangladesh announced Monday that they have will help finance safety upgrades at apparel factories in the South Asia country after the collapse of a garment complex killed more than 1,000 workers.

The news comes as the death toll in the April 24 collapse of the eight-story Rana Plaza near Dhaka rose to at least 1,127, according to officials.

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The Salt
1:32 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Sandwich Monday: Tamale Spaceship

Object larger than it appears (Ian has giant hands).
NPR

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 4:21 pm

Chicago's Tamale Spaceship food truck happened to land near our office this Sandwich Monday. We considered it our duty as hungry earthlings to eat as many tamales as it takes to ensure we're never called up for NASA's astronaut program.

The tamale heroes who run Tamale Spaceship wear Mexican wrestling masks. They do this to intimidate you into spending $4 on a single tamale and to protect themselves from flying tamale debris.

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The Two-Way
1:05 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Doctor Found Guilty Of Murder In Late-Term Abortions

Dr. Kermit Gosnell in an undated photo released by the Philadelphia District Attorney's office.
Associated Press

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 1:42 pm

A jury in Philadelphia has found Dr. Kermit Gosnell guilty of first-degree murder in three illegally performed late-term abortions.

The jury also found Gosnell, 72, guilty of involuntary manslaughter in the death of a woman who was overdosed on anesthesia while undergoing a second-trimester abortion. He was found not guilty of one other murder charge in the death of an infant. Three other similar counts were thrown out by the judge last month.

The first-degree murder convictions carry a possible death sentence.

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Shots - Health News
12:56 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Parents Get Crib Sheets For Talking With Kids About Drinking

Parents should tell parents about the risks of drinking long before they pop that first tab, a new campaign says.
iStockphoto.com

Parents often dread talking to tweens and teens about alcohol. So the government is here to help. Really.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration launched a campaign today that aims to get parents talking with their children about alcohol as early as age 9.

Age 9? Eek!

That early start is important because children start to look at alcohol more positively between ages 9 and 13, researchers say. About 10 percent of 12-year-olds have tried alcohol. That number goes up to 50 percent by age 15.

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The Two-Way
12:51 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Derek Boogaard's Family Sues NHL Over Player's Death In 2011

The family of Derek Boogaard, who died in 2011, has sued the NHL, accusing the league of negligently causing his death.
Ann Heisenfelt AP

A wrongful death lawsuit has been filed against the NHL by the family of hockey enforcer Derek Boogaard, who was 28 when he died from an accidental overdose of alcohol and oxycodone in May of 2011. The suit accuses the NHL of being negligent and with supplying the painkiller to Boogaard.

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NWPR Books
12:18 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

Camus' 'Chronicles': A History Of The Past, A Guide For The Future

Keystone Getty Images

This year marks the centenary of the birth of Albert Camus, the great novelist of existentialism. It's a movement that many Americans think of as quintessentially Parisian, born of cafe-table philosophizing and fueled by packs of Gauloises. But Camus wasn't a native of metropolitan France. He was born and raised in Algeria into a pied-noir family ("black foot," the phrase used to describe descendants of French settlers), grew up in working-class Algiers, and pined for north Africa long after he moved to the French capital in 1942.

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