Remembrances
9:11 am
Sun January 22, 2012

Penn State Football Legend Joe Paterno Dies At 85

Penn State head coach Joe Paterno stands with his team before they take the field during an NCAA college football game against the University of Wisconsin in State College, Pa., on Oct. 13, 2007.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:05 am

Joe Paterno, the man synonymous with Penn State football, died Sunday after developing complications from lung cancer. He was 85.

Paterno was an iconic figure on the sports landscape. He coached at Penn State for 61 years, though his long tenure ended amid a child sexual abuse scandal.

Read more
It's All Politics
8:45 am
Sun January 22, 2012

Gingrich Applauds Romney's Tax Decision; Santorum Declares Three-Man Race

The morning after a stinging defeat in South Carolina, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney said he would release his most recent tax returns this week, ahead of the Florida primary.

Romney said he would release his 2010 tax returns and an estimate of what he'll pay for 2011 on Tuesday. "We made a mistake in holding off as long as we did," he told Fox News Sunday.

Read more
Sports
7:28 am
Sun January 22, 2012

Legendary Penn State Coach 'JoePa' Dies At 85

Joe Paterno, the longtime Penn State coach who won more games than anyone in major college football but was fired amid a child sex abuse scandal that scarred his reputation for winning with integrity, died Sunday. He was 85.

His family released a statement Sunday morning to announce his death: "His loss leaves a void in our lives that will never be filled."

Read more

As a roving NPR correspondent based in Austin, Texas, John Burnett's beat stretches across the U.S., and, sometimes, around the world. Currently, he is serving as NPR's Religion correspondent.

Election 2012
6:44 am
Sun January 22, 2012

Mexican Cousins Keep Romney's Family Tree Rooted

Miles and Kent Romney, (left to right), distant cousins of former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney, in Colonia Juarez, Mexico. Miles believes his cousin's candidacy is nothing less than prophetic.
Peter Breslow NPR

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 6:24 am

Hispanic voters are a key group in the presidential race, and Republican hopeful Mitt Romney has been reaching out to them. Should he tell them that he himself is the son of an immigrant from Mexico?

Romney's father, George, was born in the state of Chihuahua, in a colony of polygamous Mormons.

Romney rarely speaks about the Mexican branch of his family, and he's never visited his numerous cousins south of the border — but the Romneys of Mexico are all rooting for him.

Read more
NPR Story
5:00 am
Sun January 22, 2012

Your Letters

Host Rachel Martin reads from listener letters and posts.

Movies
5:00 am
Sun January 22, 2012

Checking In On The Sundance Film Festival

Host Rachel Martin speaks with entertainment reporter Stacey Wilson about this year's Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.

Europe
5:00 am
Sun January 22, 2012

Greek Village's Muslim Culture Clashes With Athens

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 6:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Reporter Joanna Kakissis traveled to the province of Thrace, in northern Greece, to look into a religious controversy. What she found, like so much in Greece these days, was a story about the sad state of the economy.

(SOUNDBITE OF PEOPLE TALKING)

JOANNA KAKISSIS, BYLINE: Recep Pacaman greets friends at his family home in the village of Komotini. The male visitor is wearing a prayer cap; the woman, a dark headscarf.

(SOUNDBITE OF PEOPLE TALKING)

Read more
Europe
5:00 am
Sun January 22, 2012

EU Reacts To Hungary's Media Crackdown

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 6:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now to Hungary, where the only independent radio news station in the country may soon go silent. Klubradio lost its license in what its owners charge was a government move to muzzle critics. NPR's Eric Westervelt reports from Budapest.

(SOUNDBITE OF RADIO TALK SHOW)

GEORGE BOLGAR: (Foreign language spoken)

Read more
Technology
5:00 am
Sun January 22, 2012

Technological Innovations Help Dictators See All

Originally published on Wed January 25, 2012 6:24 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

That brings us to our next story: the potential for governments - from dictatorships to democracies - to exploit technology to spy on their own citizens. John Villasenor is a fellow at the Brookings Institution, and he's written a paper on how governments may soon be able to record much of what is said or done within their borders - every phone conversation, electronic message, Facebook post, tweet and video from every street corner - and then store that information indefinitely.

Read more

Pages