Author Interviews
12:59 pm
Sun February 12, 2012

When The Bankers Plotted To Overthrow FDR

The Plots Against the President

Originally published on Mon February 13, 2012 5:08 am

It was a dangerous time in America: The economy was staggering, unemployment was rampant and a banking crisis threatened the entire monetary system.

The newly elected president pursued an ambitious legislative program aimed at easing some of the troubles. But he faced vitriolic opposition from both sides of the political spectrum.

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Science
12:51 pm
Sun February 12, 2012

Virtual Penguins A Prescription For Pain?

Snow World was designed specifically with burn patients in mind-- its icy river and comical snowmen are the furthest thing imaginable from fire.
Ari Hollander Hunter Hoffman

Originally published on Tue February 14, 2012 12:44 pm

For troops injured in Iraq and Afghanistan, the deepest physical pain often comes much later — weeks, or even months, after the incident. That was the case for Sam Brown, whose story appears in this month's GQ magazine.

Brown graduated from West Point in 2006. In the late summer of 2008, he was deployed to southern Afghanistan to lead a platoon. He did security for base construction and made sure the local villagers had enough food, water, and medicine.

It was hot, often mind-numbingly dull, and dusty.

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Interviews
12:00 pm
Sun February 12, 2012

Focus Of The Family's President On Group's Work

Jim Daly took over as president of Focus on the Family, one of the most prominent Christian evangelical organizations in the U.S., in 2005. Daly discusses his work, the organization's views on divisive issues such as abortion, same-sex marriage and immigration reform.

Latin America
12:00 pm
Sun February 12, 2012

American's Arrest In Cuba Could Have Impact

A U.S. contractor working to provide Internet service to Cuba's small Jewish community was charged with spying and sentenced to 15 years in a Cuban prison. Alan Gross was reportedly working for the U.S. Agency for International Development.

Tom Huizenga is a music producer, reporter and blogger for NPR Music. He hosts NPR's classical music blog Deceptive Cadence.

A regular contributor of stories about classical music on NPR's news programs, Huizenga regularly introduces intriguing new classical CDs to listeners on the weekend version of All Things Considered. He contributes to NPR Music's "Song of the Day."

Deceptive Cadence
9:51 am
Sun February 12, 2012

From Hyperpianos To Harmonious Handel: New Classical Albums

Lisa Smirnova studied Handel's suites for five years before recording them.
ECM

What's the saying — the more things change, the more they stay the same? It seems that's how it goes in the ways we make music. MIT futurologist Tod Machover rethinks traditional instruments, coming up with new things like the hyperpiano; Pianist Michael Chertock gives it a go in an explosive excerpt below.

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Remembrances
5:09 am
Sun February 12, 2012

Whitney Houston, A 'Perfect Instrument,' Dies

Pop diva Whitney Houston was found dead in her Beverly Hills hotel room on the eve of the 54th Grammy Awards.
Getty Images

Originally published on Sun February 12, 2012 2:52 pm

On the eve of the 54th Grammy Awards in Los Angeles, the conversation was all about Whitney Houston. The 48-year-old pop diva was discovered dead in her room at the Beverly Hilton Saturday afternoon. The cause of her death was under investigation.

Houston died alone in the same hotel that was the venue for a party she had often entered in triumph: the annual pre-Grammy Awards bash given by her mentor, recording impresario Clive Davis.

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Movie Interviews
5:00 am
Sun February 12, 2012

'Ides Of March' Writer Goes From Stage To Screen

Writer Beau Willimon turned his stage play, Farragut North, into the film, The Ides of March. Host Rachel Martin speaks to Willimon about the film, one of five nominated for an Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Europe
5:00 am
Sun February 12, 2012

Sarkozy's Re-Election On The Backburner

France is holding a presidential election in the spring, and the campaign is in full swing, sort of. The only thing missing is one of the candidates: President Nicolas Sarkozy. As NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports, he hasn't yet announced whether he's running for re-election.

Asia
5:00 am
Sun February 12, 2012

Aung San Suu Kyi's Improbable Campaign

The main opposition leader in Myanmar, Aung San Suu Kyi, is campaigning for a seat in parliament in her constituency outside Rangoon. It's a scene that seemed impossible only a few months ago, before the military-backed government began a process of change. Host Rachel Martin speaks with NPR's Anthony Kuhn from Rangoon.

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