The Salt
5:00 am
Sun February 19, 2012

Dining After 'Downton Abbey': Why British Food Was So Bad For So Long

"Downton Abbey's" kitchen maid (Sophie McShera) and cook (Lesley Nicol) teach Lady Sybil (Jessica Brown-Findlay) the basics of cooking. Many Edwardian servants had a pretty good handle on advanced cuisines, says food historian Ivan Day.
Courtesy (C) Carnival Film & Television Limited 2011 for Masterpiece

Originally published on Fri October 19, 2012 12:06 pm

If you've ever watched the television show Downton Abbey, you've probably deduced that dining was a very, very big deal in the lives of the landed gentry of Edwardian England.

Much of the drama surrounding the aristocratic Crawley family and their servants unfolds against a tableau of the table.

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Around the Nation
5:00 am
Sun February 19, 2012

North Vs South: Carolinas Seek To Redraw Border

Originally published on Sun February 19, 2012 7:55 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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NPR Story
5:00 am
Sun February 19, 2012

In Kabul, First Hints Of Reconciliation Efforts

Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin speaks with NPR's Quil Lawrence in Kabul about efforts at reconciliation between the Afghan government and the Taliban.

NPR Story
5:00 am
Sun February 19, 2012

What's At Stake In U.S.-Taliban Reconciliation?

The United States has reportedly started talks with the Taliban about reconciling before the 2014 NATO pullout from Afghanistan. Afghan President Hamid Karzai says his government is involved, a claim the Taliban deny. Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin talks with U.S. Special Envoy to Afghanistan and Pakistan, Marc Grossman.

NPR Story
5:00 am
Sun February 19, 2012

'Tinkering' With A Spy Classic Gets Oscar Nod

Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin speaks to Peter Straughan, one of the screenwriters of the film, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy. The current remake of John le Carre's spy novel is nominated for a best-adapted screenplay Oscar.

NPR Story
5:00 am
Sun February 19, 2012

Providence Seeks Aid From Ivy League Resident

Originally published on Sun February 19, 2012 7:55 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Brown University, a private school in Providence, Rhode Island, is being asked to do more for its hometown. The city is almost in the red and the mayor is calling on the tax exempt colleges and hospitals to help out. As Ian Donnis of Rhode Island Public Radio reporters, all of this has triggered some tension between Providence and its Ivy League school.

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NPR Story
5:00 am
Sun February 19, 2012

What's Behind The Rise Of College Tuition?

Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin talks to NPR education reporter Claudio Sanchez about the huge rise in public college tuition as states face a budget squeeze.

NPR Story
5:00 am
Sun February 19, 2012

On L.A. Streets, It's Not Easy Being Green (For Bikes)

Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin speaks with Paul Audley, the president of Film L.A., about the new bright green bike lane on Spring Street in Los Angeles. The shade of green, and the placement of the bike lane have angered film crews, who normally use the street as a stand-in for metropolitan areas around the country, and for several eras.

NPR Story
5:00 am
Sun February 19, 2012

Rising Gas Prices Could Put Sting On Summer

The national average for unleaded gas has risen to $3.50 a gallon only three times in history. This year's rise to that threshold is the earliest ever, and the Department of Energy suggests that prices could near $5 a gallon by the start of the summer driving season. Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin talks with Phil Flynn of the futures brokerage PFGBEST.

The Two-Way
4:57 am
Sun February 19, 2012

Paying Respects To A Fallen Journalist In Libya

The grave of Mohamed "Mo" Nabbous is seen in Libya. Mo was killed by a sniper on March 19, 2011 while filming Libya's revolution.
Andy Carvin NPR

A light mist of cold rain started falling on us from the moment we reached the cemetery. If I hadn't felt it on my face, I probably wouldn't have even noticed it, as the hardscrabble stretching throughout the grave yard appeared just as parched as one might expect in a desert country.

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