History
10:00 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Ballard: 100 Years Later, Titanic Still Captivates

The bow railing of RMS Titanic, illuminated by the Mir 1 submersible. Read more about the wreck in a National Geographic report.
Emory Kristof National Geographic Stock

On April 10, 1912, the Titanic set sail for New York City from Southampton in England. Four days later, the ship struck an iceberg and sank in the frigid waters of the Atlantic.

The rest of the story has been the subject of countless books, shows and films about the thousands of people who traveled on the ship's maiden voyage, the dramatic events of the final few hours, and the legend of the "unsinkable" Titanic.

Read more
Middle East
10:00 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Six-Point Syria Plan On The Brink Of Failure

The White House announced Tuesday that there are "no signs yet" that President Assad has pulled back troops and stopped attacks on civilians. Monday, the Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan said violence spilled across the border when Syrian forces fired shots into a refugee camp in Turkey.

Education
10:00 am
Tue April 10, 2012

'Savage U' Takes Frank Sex Talk To Campus

Dan Savage has made a career offering advice on relationships and sex in his nationally-syndicated column, "Savage Love." Now he's taking his act on the road for his new show, Savage U, in which he travels to college campuses across the country giving students advice on sex and relationships.

The Two-Way
10:00 am
Tue April 10, 2012

George W. Bush Says He Doesn't Miss Being President

Former President George W. Bush in Washington, D.C., last September.
Brendan Hoffman Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 20, 2012 9:50 pm

"I'm often asked 'Do you miss the presidency?' I really don't," former President George W. Bush told an audience in New York City this morning, Politico reports.

It was an "was unbelievably interesting experience," he added, but "I had plenty of the limelight."

Read more
Music Reviews
9:25 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Bonnie Raitt's 'Slipstream': A Barnstorming Good Time

Bonnie Raitt.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 1:39 pm

The warmth and vigor of Bonnie Raitt's voice throughout her new album Slipstream, even when she's covering an oldie such as Gerry Rafferty's "Right Down the Line," is vital and fresh — urgent, even. Raitt has always possessed a gift for taking a familiar phrase and rendering it in a manner that compels a listener to think anew about what the words really mean.

Read more
Economy
9:06 am
Tue April 10, 2012

For Economy, Government Work Is No Panacea

Some states are still struggling; California has lost 32,000 teaching positions since 2008. Here, teachers, parents and supporters rally as the Los Angeles Unified School District board meets to consider budget cuts and layoffs on Feb. 14.
Damian Dovarganes AP

At the end of most previous recessions, hiring has increased among state and local governments, helping the broader economy to recover.

That's not happening this time around.

Layoffs have started to taper off, and tax receipts are starting to improve. But states are still a long way from bringing their workforces back up to pre-recession levels. And cities and counties remain in greater fiscal peril.

Read more
The Two-Way
9:00 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Increasingly, Reporters Must First Answer Some Questions

May we see some ID?
Alan Greenblatt

As he's been reporting for NPR.org in recent months, Alan Greenblatt has noticed something unusual: he's increasingly being asked to prove who he is and that he is, in fact, a journalist. Here's what he found when he started to ask why that's happening:

How many people would bother to impersonate a reporter? Enough, apparently, to cause some government officials to do preliminary background checks on people to whom they grant interviews.

Read more
Law
9:00 am
Tue April 10, 2012

Are Hate Crime Laws Necessary?

A shooting spree that left three African-Americans dead in Oklahoma and the death of unarmed black teenager Trayvon Martin have renewed public debate about hate crime laws. Host Michel Martin speaks with law professor and former federal prosecutor Paul Butler about hate crime statutes and whether they're necessary.

Sports
8:54 am
Tue April 10, 2012

'Winding Up' As The Mets' Knuckleball Pitcher

R.A. Dickey currently plays for the New York Mets. He was previously with the Seattle Mariners, Minnesota Twins, Texas Rangers and Milwaukee Brewers.
courtesy of the author

Originally published on Wed April 11, 2012 7:58 am

Most pitchers in the majors stick to fastballs, curveballs, sliders and change-ups when facing batters at the plate.

But not New York Mets right-hander R.A. Dickey. Dickey is currently the only knuckleball pitcher in a current rotation. At 37, he's also one of the older pitchers in the league and has seen his career — and life — mimic the erratic trajectory of the difficult pitch he throws game after game.

Read more
It's All Politics
8:53 am
Tue April 10, 2012

'A Moon-Colony Guy?' The Republican Campaign Returns

After a relative lull in campaigning, the Republican presidential candidates are back at it Tuesday in Pennsylvania, Delaware, North Carolina and Texas.

Read more

Pages