The Salt
12:16 pm
Tue May 15, 2012

Vermont Beer Makers Bring Back Old-Time Maple Sap Brews

This farmer, pouring maple sap into his pail near Wilmington, Vt., in 1954, may have turned the dregs of the season's sap into beer.
Robert F. Sisson National Geographic/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 5:33 am

In Vermont, the last sap in the spring maple sugaring season isn't considered good for much. It's too dark and strong to use for commercial maple syrup — people tend to like the light and clear stuff.

But long ago, that late season sap was used in a potent dark beer that offered some cool relief to farmers when the hay was cut in the heat of summer.

Now some local microbreweries are bringing the historic drink back from extinction.

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Music Reviews
12:15 pm
Tue May 15, 2012

Lisa Marie Presley: Rock's Princess Finds Her Voice

Lisa Marie Presley has weathered personal storms with grace. On her new album, she establishes her own distinct identity.
Troy Paul

Originally published on Mon May 21, 2012 5:21 pm

Lisa Marie Presley is a curiosity. Famous from birth, she is rock's only real princess. Her face is a stunning combination of her parents' best features. Her marriages have been, well, unusual. Who could forget her awkward television kiss with then-husband Michael Jackson? Or the few months of wedded bliss to actor and Elvis fanatic Nicolas Cage? She has led a colorful life — one that overshadowed her music career when she started making records in 2003.

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From Our Listeners
11:32 am
Tue May 15, 2012

Letters: Losing Faith And Military Marriages

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 7:07 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

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Sports
11:31 am
Tue May 15, 2012

Fan Says Tear Down Wrigley To Save The Cubs

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 7:07 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Fans of the Chicago Cubs come up with all kinds of explanations for the team's epic ineptitude: the curse of the Billy Goat, Steve Bartman's 2003 foul ball catch, and generations of incompetent management. In the Wall Street Journal today, Rich Cohen comes to a different conclusion: Wrigley Field. Destroy it, annihilate it, he wrote. Implosion or explosion, get rid of it, not merely the structure but the ground on which it stands.

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Race
11:28 am
Tue May 15, 2012

The Politics Of Fat In Black And White

Alice Randall is also the author of The Wind Done Gone.
Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 9:13 am

"Many black women are fat because we want to be." With those words in a New York Times op-ed, novelist Alice Randall sparked a controversy. Touching on flashpoints of race, weight, politics and gender, her contention prompted a debate and raised serious questions about health, culture and race.

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Law
11:24 am
Tue May 15, 2012

'Stop And Frisk' Works, But It's Problematic

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 7:07 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

The New York City police reported that its officers stopped and frisked almost 700,000 people last year, which prompted a fresh round of protests over the controversial policy. In today's Washington Post, Richard Cohen writes that these questionable tactics have to be measured against their effects. New York City is heaven on earth, he wrote, possibly because it is a certain kind of hell for young black and Hispanic men. Do results justify questionable police tactics?

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NPR Story
11:17 am
Tue May 15, 2012

At 96, Historian Lewis Reflects On 'A Century'

Bernard Lewis is also the author of the best-selling What Went Wrong?
Alan Kolc

Originally published on Sun May 20, 2012 5:42 am

Over his long academic career, Bernard Lewis has arguably become the world's greatest historian of the Middle East. Now, at 96, Lewis turns his attention inward in a memoir that looks back on his life, work and legacy.

The linguist and scholar's career began before World War II, and in a new memoir he covers more than a few sensitive areas, from race and slavery in Islam, to the clash of civilizations and his long argument with scholar Edward Said, to his role as an adviser to former Vice President Dick Cheney.

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The Two-Way
10:55 am
Tue May 15, 2012

She's 100 (Almost) And Still Swimming: Another Centenarian To Admire

Marie Kelleher.
U.S. Masters Swimming

We have a fondness for stories about centenarians, we have to admit.

There was Fauja Singh, the 100-year-old "Turbaned Tornado," who finished the Toronto Marathon last year.

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The Two-Way
10:53 am
Tue May 15, 2012

NATO Invites Pakistani President To Chicago Summit

NATO has just asked the Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari to attend the May 20-21 summit in Chicago. The AP says the overture signals that the rift between NATO and Islamabad may be coming to a resolution.

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The Two-Way
10:31 am
Tue May 15, 2012

Bomb In Bogotá Kills At Least Two In Assassination Attempt

Police officers inspect the remains of vehicles on Tuesday after an explosion ripped through a crowded area of Bogotá injuring at least 10 people according to the mayor's office.
Guillermo Legaria AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 15, 2012 2:36 pm

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos said a bomb detonated in the middle of Bogotá, the country's capital and largest city, was intended to kill former interior minister Ferdnando Londoño Hoyos.

El País reports that Santos condemned the attack, saying the bomb exploded next to the armored vehicle Londoño was travelling in.

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