The Two-Way
9:22 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Challenge: Use The Moog Doodle To Play The 'All Things Considered' Theme

Google's Moog Doodle.
Google.com

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 3:05 pm

  • A clip of the current 'All Things Considered' theme
  • Bob Boilen reporting, in 2002
  • Two early versions of the 'All Things Considered' theme

You've probably know by now that Google is paying homage to Robert Moog today with a Doodle that's a virtual version of the iconic Moog Synthesizer. Moog died in 2005. Today would have been his 78th birthday.

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Music + Culture
9:21 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Objectively Speaking, It's All About The Prop Master

Katie Falkenberg For NPR

A wooden sled. A weapon to vanquish a villain. Indiana Jones' whip, the Maltese Falcon — even Babe the pig. In the movies, if an actor touches it, it's a prop. And if it's a prop, a property master arranged for it to be there.

On the set of Disney's upcoming reboot The Muppets — a Muppet, by the way, is not a prop — it's prop master Trish Gallaher Glenn who provided the telephone for Kermit the Frog. But not the very old typewriter on Kermit's desk.

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Music + Culture
9:21 am
Wed May 23, 2012

For Location Scouts, It's All About Making The Scene

Location scout Doug Dresser needs creepy places for a teen fantasy-adventure film. One possibility: the old Linda Vista Community Hospital, built in 1904. Supposedly it's haunted.
Cindy Carpien NPR/Courtesy Doug Dresser (except as noted)

In the old days, movies — even the big epics — were shot on studio back lots. Tara, that iconic Gone With the Wind plantation, was made of plywood and papier maché.

These days, movie locations are mostly real, though. And they're found by location scouts, who are often the first people hired for a film.

Should be easy work, right? You drive around town, spot a house you think could work for a film, drive back home? Not quite.

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World
8:51 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Islamists Vs. Mubarak Holdovers In Egypt Elections

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:46 am

Campaign fever is in the air in Cairo and around Egypt. Millions of voters go to the polls, Tuesday and Wednesday, for what many believe to be the country's first free election in its long history. Host Michel Martin discusses what's at stake in this election with Sherine Tadros, the Egypt correspondent for Al Jazeera English.

Race
8:51 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Civil Rights Leader: Equality Means Equality

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:46 am

The NAACP is officially supporting same-sex marriage. The group says marriage equality is a civil right and is encouraging black voters to support the issue if it shows up on state ballots. Host Michel Martin talks with Julian Bond, chairman emeritus of the group.

Election 2012
8:51 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Does Obama Have A Messaging Problem?

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:46 am

Republicans have pounced on a comment by Newark, New Jersey mayor and Obama re-election surrogate Cory Booker. He called the Obama campaign's attacks on Mitt Romney's time at Bain Capital "nauseating." Host Michel Martin discusses the art of messaging with former presidential speechwriter Mary Kate Cary, and journalism professor Cynthia Tucker.

Fitness & Nutrition
8:45 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Happy Feet: Tips For Healthier Running

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:58 am

After hearing a lot about barefoot running, New York Times Phys Ed columnist Gretchen Reynolds decided to try it out for herself. An amateur runner for several decades, Reynolds says she thought the transition would be easy. But almost immediately, she got injured.

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Mongolia Booms
7:47 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Old Ways Disappearing In The New Mongolia

A baby Bactrian camel is tied up at the edge of the Badam family's small farmstead. Bactrian camels — like all Mongolian mammals — have thick fur to withstand the winters.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Thu May 24, 2012 6:57 pm

Mongolia, the land of Genghis Khan and nomadic herders, is in the midst of a remarkable transition. Rich in coal, gold and copper, this country of fewer than 3 million people in Central Asia is riding a mineral boom that is expected to more than double its GDP within a decade. The rapid changes simultaneously excite and unnerve many Mongolians, who hope mining can help pull many out of poverty, but worry it will ravage the environment and further erode the nation's distinctive, nomadic identity.

Last of four parts

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The Two-Way
7:34 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Wall Street Titans, Behaving Badly

Television correspondent Sabrina Quagliozzi reports from inside the Nasdaq MarketSite in New York's Times Square on Monday.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:30 am

The pillars of Wall Street are shaking.

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Thunderstorm Science
7:30 am
Wed May 23, 2012

Study: Summer Thunderclouds Warm the Atmosphere

Researchers in the Northwest have found some pollution is making thunderstorms stronger and the atmosphere warmer. Correspondent Courtney Flatt explains.

Those giant, anvil-shaped thunderclouds you see looming in the distance may actually be getting bigger and stronger this summer, all because of aerosol pollutants.

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