NPR Story
4:43 am
Sun May 27, 2012

The Best Moment Of Deployment: Coming Home

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 5:55 am

Throughout our show this Memorial Day weekend, we're hearing from members of the 182nd Infantry Regiment of the Army National Guard. In this installment, Staff Sgt. James Bradosky describes a family tragedy that struck just before he left for war.

NPR Story
4:43 am
Sun May 27, 2012

The State Of The Church

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 5:55 am

The Catholic Church has been in the public spotlight a lot this year. The issues of contraception and gay marriage have been part of the presidential campaign and church leaders have weighed in. There have also been new revelations in a case involving leaked Vatican documents, and it may actually be a case where the butler did it. Host Rachel Martin speaks with John Allen, a senior correspondent for the National Catholic Reporter.

NPR Story
4:43 am
Sun May 27, 2012

A Cook-Out Brings Home To Afghanistan

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 5:55 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Throughout our show this Memorial Day weekend, members of the 182nd National Guard are sharing memories of a year spent at war.

SPECIALIST KORY DESMOND: I am Specialist Kory Desmond and some of my memories is of a cookout. When I got to Afghanistan on this little base, it's right on the Pakistan border basically, the eastern part of Afghanistan. Me and couple of guys thought to cook for a cookout. And after our whole summer there in Afghanistan and not being able to have any cookouts, it was a pretty good time.

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Home Front: Soldiers Learn To Live After War
3:35 am
Sun May 27, 2012

After A Year In Afghanistan, Memories That Stick

Michael Currie was stationed in Afghanistan for the past year, leaving behind his wife and daughters. His most vivid memory of his service was the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11.
Becky Lettenberger NPR

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 1:40 pm

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National Teachers Initiative
3:34 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Hard Lessons Follow Rocky Start For Chicago Teacher

Tyrese Graham teaches science at John Marshall Metropolitan High School in Chicago.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 6:39 am

Tyrese Graham is a second-year science teacher at John Marshall Metropolitan High School on the West Side of Chicago. When he started teaching there, Marshall was among the worst public schools in the city.

When Graham walked into his first class, he could hardly speak over the noise of the students. He tried to make a point by not talking.

"I'll let you finish, but realize, every moment that I'm not talking and providing you instruction, you guys will be giving that back to me," he told them.

Graham's remarks were met with a sharp rebuke from one of his students.

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Music Interviews
3:33 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Deep In The Desert, Monks Make Transcendent Music

The monks of The Monastery of Christ in the Desert, on the grounds in Abiquiu, N.M.
Sergio Salvador Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 5:55 am

If you drive about an hour and a half north of Santa Fe, N.M., into a place called the Chama Canyon, you might hear the clanging of church bells in the distance. The Monastery of Christ in the Desert was founded there in 1964 and is home to a community of Benedictine monks. They spend their days in prayer, work, meditation — and music.

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Music Interviews
3:33 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Canadian Brass: Spiking The Recital With Humor

"Given that we were brass players when we started out, we had a very tall hill to climb just to get people interested in our music," says Canadian Brass founding member Chuck Daellenbach (center).
Bo Huang Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 5:55 am

When the Canadian Brass came to NPR for a Tiny Desk Concert, the group kicked off the show with a piece its members say has been central to its repertoire for more than 40 years. It's a transcription of an organ work, Johann Sebastian Bach's "Little" Fugue in G Minor.

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Economy
3:32 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Help Wanted. But Not For Mid-Level Jobs

Job seekers fill out applications at a job fair in the Queens borough of New York City earlier this month. Economists say jobs in the middle — in sales, administration and assembly, for example — are being squeezed.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 4:49 pm

Unemployment figures for May come out Friday. While the numbers will show how many jobs have been added or lost, they won't tell us much about the quality of positions filled or illustrate what economists already know: that the middle of the job market is hollowing out.

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Religion
3:32 am
Sun May 27, 2012

Philadelphia Priest Abuse Trial Takes Combative Turn

Monsignor William Lynn leaves the Criminal Justice Center in Philadelphia in March. When he finally took to the stand after two months of testimony, the prosecutor called him a liar over and over.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 4:25 pm

A clergy sex-abuse trial is intensifying in a Philadelphia courtroom. One defendant is James Brennan, a priest accused of trying to rape a minor.

What's drawing attention is the second defendant, Monsignor William Lynn. Lynn is the first high-level Catholic official to be criminally prosecuted — not for abusing minors himself, but for failing to protect children from predator priests.

Failure To Protect?

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History
3:31 am
Sun May 27, 2012

75 Years Later: Building The Golden Gate Bridge

San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge opened in 1937, connecting San Francisco to Marin County in the north.
George Rose Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 27, 2012 8:29 am

Seventy-five years ago today, San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge opened to the public. People walked across the bridge for the first time, marveling at what was then the largest suspension bridge in the world.

Before the project began, many people thought building the bridge was impossible. And when the construction started, most thought that dozens would die in the process. The rule of thumb at the time was that for every million dollars spent on a project, one person would die — and the Golden Gate Bridge was going to cost $37 million.

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