Monkey See
10:03 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

Can Men And Women Be Friends?

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon June 18, 2012 6:41 am

It's a question that kicks around endlessly without resolution: Can men and women really be just friends? On Weekend Edition Sunday, NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Faith Salie and Mario Correa, hosts of WNYC's RelationShow, about this very topic.

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Theater
9:03 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

The Stage On Which Juliet First Called Out For Romeo

Archaeologists from the Museum of London Archaeology recently excavated the site of the 16th-century Curtain Theatre, where Shakespeare staged some of his plays.
Museum of London Archaeology AP

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 12:05 pm

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of the Bard's old stomping grounds — ruins of a famous 16th-century theater, buried below the streets of modern London. Known in its heyday as the Curtain Theatre, it's often been eclipsed by its more famous younger sibling, the Globe.

But the Curtain is a big deal in its own right. Some of Shakespeare's most famous works premiered there — Romeo and Juliet and Henry V, just to name a couple. NPR's Rachel Martin talked to the archaeologist who dug up the theater, Chris Thomas of the Museum of London.

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Sunday Puzzle
9:03 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

Hit Me Baby One More Time

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 10:23 am

On-Air Challenge: Every answer is a word, phrase or name starting with the letter "B," ending in "Y" and having "A" and "B" inside, in that order, although not necessarily consecutively. For example, if I said "assistant to a baseball team," the answer would be either "batboy" or "ballboy."

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Around the Nation
2:30 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

State Of The Unions: Labor And The Middle Class

Occupy Wall Street protesters joined with unions in New York on May 1, a traditional day of global protests in sympathy with unions and leftist politics.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 6:05 pm

For many full-time employees in the United States, the five-day work week, paid overtime and holidays are expected benefits. This wasn't always so, and many workers' benefits today are the achievements of labor unions.

Just five decades ago, unions were on the frontline of the fight for the rights and wages of the middle class. But today, unions are on the decline.

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World
2:12 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

Egypt Faces Tense Election For New President

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 2:24 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

In Egypt, voters went to the polls today to pick a new president to replace Hosni Mubarak, who was ousted in a revolution last year. Voters are casting ballots just a few days after that nation's highest court issued a ruling that dissolves Egypt's first freely elected parliament, which was dominated by Islamists. The latest election is a runoff between an Islamist engineer and Mubarak's last prime minister, the two top vote-getters in the first round of presidential polls held last month.

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NPR Story
2:12 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

Gauging The Impact Of Obama's Immigration Policy

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 2:24 pm

President Obama announced major changes in the country's immigration policy on Friday. NPR's Mara Liasson talks with weekends on All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden about what the changes are and the political impact they may have this election season.

Arts & Life
1:23 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

Embracing The Quirkiness Of Djuna Barnes

novels she's now known for, women's rights advocate Djuna Barnes was a journalist and illustrator." href="/post/embracing-quirkiness-djuna-barnes" class="noexit lightbox">
Before publishing the plays and novels she's now known for, women's rights advocate Djuna Barnes was a journalist and illustrator.
Djuna Barnes Papers, Special Collections, University of Maryland Libraries

Originally published on Sat June 16, 2012 4:06 pm

A writer, illustrator and provocateur in the Roaring '20s, Djuna Barnes stood out.

"She was much more interested in embracing the quirky and embracing that idea that became so famous in feminist circles half a century later," Catherine Morris says, "the idea that the personal is political."

Morris is the curator of a new exhibition of Barnes' writings and illustrations called "Newspaper Fictions" at the Brooklyn Museum's Sackler Center for Feminist Art.

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Music Interviews
1:03 pm
Sat June 16, 2012

One Father, Eight Sons, Nine Shiny Brass Bells

The Hypnotic Brass Ensemble features eight of trumpeter Kelan Phil Cohran's sons.
Georgia Khun

Originally published on Tue November 27, 2012 12:52 pm

Over the course of 85-year-old Kelan Phil Cohran's long career as an avant-garde jazz trumpeter, he's toured the world, performing with everyone from Sun Ra to Sarah Vaughan.

When not on the road, Cohran has worked as a music educator, teaching music in schools and prisons, and to his own children.

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NPR listeners often ask, "What is her name anyway — Keema Leski, Kim Alesky, Kay Marlenski, or what?" Her name is Kee Malesky, nee Christine Mary Shields, of Brooklyn, N.Y. The "Christine" became "Kee" when her youngest sister learned to talk, and because she thought it was a really cool name, she stuck with it.

Kee Facts: A Few Things You Didn't Know
9:15 am
Sat June 16, 2012

Follow The Money: On The Trail Of Watergate Lore

A photograph of the Watergate complex that was used as an exhibit in the trial of G. Gordon Liddy.
National Archives

"Follow the money" – a phrase that's now part of our national lexicon — was supposedly whispered to reporter Bob Woodward by Deep Throat as a way to cut through the lies and deceptions and find the truth about the Watergate scandal. The so-called third-rate burglary that happened 40 years ago this weekend ended the presidency of Richard Nixon. But did Mark Felt, the former associate director of the FBI who admitted to being Deep Throat in 2005, ever really say "follow the money"?

He did not.

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