The Two-Way
12:05 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

80 Percent Of Lightning Strike Victims Are Male, But Why?

Lightning streaks across the sky in Tyler, Texas, as a powerful line of thunderstorms moved across the state in April.
Dr. Scott M. Lieberman AP

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 1:42 pm

This tweet from the National Weather Service caught our attention, today:

"More than 80% of lightning victims are male. Be a force of nature by knowing your risk, taking action and being an example"

Eighty percent seemed to us pretty significant, so we turned to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and asked, "Why?"

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Law
12:03 pm
Mon June 25, 2012

Immigration Ruling May Close, Open Legal Windows

Arizona Republican Gov. Jan Brewer leaves a podium at the state Capitol in Phoenix after responding to President Obama's immigration speech on June 15. Brewer said the speech represented a "pre-emptive strike" aimed at what then was an upcoming Supreme Court ruling on Arizona's immigration law.
Matt York AP

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 4:16 am

The Supreme Court's decision to strike down much of Arizona's immigration law is being hailed as a victory by both sides in a fight likely to spawn many more legal battles.

Monday, the court struck down three of four provisions in the law but upheld, at least for the moment, a controversial measure allowing police to check the immigration status of anyone stopped or detained for any reason.

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Animals
11:25 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Reviving Extinct Species May Not Be Science Fiction

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 11:26 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan.

Wander through one of this country's fine museums of natural history and you'll see animals you'll never see in a zoo: the wooly mammoth, the dodo bird, animals extinct for centuries. But for Stewart Brand extinct doesn't mean gone forever. He's working on a new project, "Revive and Restore," to de-extinct animals we never thought we'd see alive.

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PG-13: Risky Reads
11:22 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Teenage Brain: Gateway To A 'Bright And Dark' World

Cover detail

Originally published on Tue June 26, 2012 2:27 pm

Meg Wolitzer is a novelist whose most recent works include The Uncoupling and a book for young readers, The Fingertips of Duncan Dorfman.

You know how people talk about so-called gateway drugs — drugs that lead to harder ones? I think some books can be considered gateway books, because reading them leads you to start reading other books that are similar but more intense. Lisa, Bright and Dark, John Neufeld's 1969 novel for young adults, is one of these.

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Environment
11:12 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Researchers Offer First-Hand View Of Climate Change

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 11:28 am

As the climate changes, scientists are documenting measurable shifts in the natural world — from a tremendous loss in Arctic sea ice and an increase in extreme weather like drought, floods and heatwaves, to the migration of plants and animals to new latitudes.

Law
11:08 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Court Upholds 'Show Me Your Papers' In Arizona

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 11:23 am

The Supreme Court has delivered a split ruling on Arizona's immigration law, striking down several key elements but upholding the "show me your papers" provision. The controversial provision allows local police to check the immigration status of people they stop in the normal course of their duties.

Environment
10:56 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Seeking The Micro, Scientists Find The Big Picture

Originally published on Mon June 25, 2012 11:22 am

E.O Wilson and Sylvia Earle see the through very different lenses. Wilson started with his eyes to the ground, following ants as they lead him to the study of biodiversity and human nature. Earle dove into the Gulf of Mexico to focus on aquatic plants. That underwater view ultimately led her to study the relationship between degrading seas and life everywhere.

The Two-Way
10:54 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Vatican Hires Fox News Reporter To Advise Media Office

People gather on St. Peter's square to hear Pope Benedict XVI at the Vatican Sunday. The Vatican has hired Fox News correspondent Greg Burke to advise its press office.
Alberto Pizzoli AFP/Getty Images

Seeking to modernize and widen its dealings with the media, the Vatican has hired Fox News Channel's Rome correspondent to advise its press office. The move will put journalist Greg Burke, who is also a member of Opus Dei, into a new role working with Vatican spokesman Federico Lombardi.

For NPR's Newscast desk, Sylvia Poggioli reports from Rome:

"Greg Burke, 52, has been with Fox 10 years, and he'll be the first Vatican communications expert with experience outside the world of Catholic media.

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Remembrances
10:38 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Fresh Air Remembers Broadway's Richard Adler

Celebrated composer and lyricist Richard Adler has died at the age of 90.
Bob Gomel Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

This interview was originally broadcast on Aug. 9, 1990.

In 1955, The New York Times called Richard Adler and his writing partner, Jerry Ross, "Broadway's hottest young composers." Together, they wrote the music and lyrics for The Pajama Game and Damn Yankees, two shows that became known for the songs "Hey There," "Steam Heat," "Hernando's Hideaway" and "Whatever Lola Wants."

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Law
10:38 am
Mon June 25, 2012

Ala. Juvenile Murderers Law Ruled Unconstitutional

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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