Law
12:43 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Justice Delayed: After Three Decades, An Apology

Kirk Odom and his wife, Harriet, outside the H. Carl Moultrie Courthouse in Washington, D.C. On Tuesday, the Justice Department said there was "clear and convincing evidence" that Odom is innocent of a 1981 rape and robbery, for which he spent more than two decades behind bars.
Carrie Johnson NPR

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 4:34 pm

Nearly 31 years after he was convicted of rape and armed robbery, Kirk Odom on Tuesday all but won his fight to be declared an innocent man.

The Justice Department filed court papers saying, "There is clear and convincing evidence that Mr. Odom is innocent of the charges for which he was convicted," and apologized for the "terrible injustice."

Read more
Poverty In America
12:42 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Cycle Of Poverty Hard To Break In Poorest U.S. City

Devora Trapp, 24, picks up her 8-month-old son, Dardarius Taylor, late one evening at the Opportunity House's Second Street Learning Center, a 24-hour day care center for low-income families in Reading, Pa.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 8:31 pm

In the middle of the night, most children are home in bed. But at the Second Street Learning Center in Reading, Pa., a half-dozen tiny bodies are curled up on green plastic floor mats, fast asleep.

Conversations are hushed. The lights are dim. At 1:30 a.m., day care worker Virginia Allen gently shakes two little sisters, snuggled under the same blanket, to tell them that their mother is there to pick them up.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:38 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

The Heat, The Fires, The Flooding: Is Climate Change To Blame?

People enjoy the view from a lifeguard structure as the sun sets at Seal Beach, south of Los Angeles, California on Monday. Much of the U.S. has been gripped by a relentless heatwave, sparking health warnings and sending people to makeshift cooling shelters.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 2:12 pm

Every time there's been a bout of severe weather, like the heat wave in the northeast, the wild fires in the west and flooding across the U.K, the talk, naturally, turns to climate change.

The big question: How much does global warming have to do with severe weather?

Read more
NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
12:12 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

A Twitter Conversation: #NPRCities Roundtable

Peter Booth and Alexandra Booth iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 4:34 pm

What do you think makes a better city? Do you like a mix of old and new on the same block?

Several urban thinkers joined us for a discussion on Twitter, including Bruce Katz of the Brookings Institution, Carol Coletta of ArtPlace America, writer and blogger Aaron Renn, The Atlantic Cities editor Sommer Mathis and Diana Lind of Next American City.

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
12:01 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

When Does An App Need FDA's Blessing?

Pedometer, an app, keeps track of your steps, distance traveled and calories burned.
Benjamin Morris NPR

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 4:34 pm

Bernard Farrell obsesses over every bite he eats, every minute of exercise he gets, and everything that stresses him out. And, more than anything else, Farrell obsesses over his blood sugar.

He has to. Farrell, 55, has Type 1 diabetes.

"Pretty much everything affects our blood sugar," says Farrell, of Littleton, Mass.

Read more
From Our Listeners
11:59 am
Tue July 10, 2012

Letters: Health Care Law And Extreme Anxiety

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

It's Tuesday, and time to read from your comments.

Read more
NPR Story
11:31 am
Tue July 10, 2012

Bad Book Review Sparks Fictional Friendship

Will Shortz."" href="/post/bad-book-review-sparks-fictional-friendship" class="noexit lightbox">
Patrick Somerville set up a real email address for his character, Ben, who he describes as "kind of a wayfaring pothead version of Will Shortz."
Liv Friis-larsen iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 7:38 am

On July 2, The New York Times ran a review of author Patrick Somerville's book This Bright River. It was not a flattering assessment. Film and literary critic Janet Maslin described the starting point as "generic" and the destination as "soggy."

When Somerville read the review, he realized the whole thing hinged on a factual error: Maslin mixed up two characters from the very beginning, confusing which one got hit in the head.

Read more
Middle East
11:07 am
Tue July 10, 2012

Fighting In Syria Takes Harsh Human Toll

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 11:57 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

Read more
Economy
11:07 am
Tue July 10, 2012

Downward Mobility A Modern Economic Reality

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 11:54 am

Transcript

NEAL CONAN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Neal Conan in Washington. Last week's disappointing jobs numbers offer little hope of change anytime soon for the millions of long-term unemployed and underemployed Americans. For too many, this crisis has extended so long that cherished plans have been set aside and sights lowered: owning a home maybe, a college fund for the kids, family vacations.

Read more

Pages