NPR Story
1:41 am
Thu July 19, 2012

Interest Rate Scandal Follow Up

Originally published on Thu July 19, 2012 5:01 am

An influential group of bankers comes up with the critical interest rate known as the LIBOR. The world uses it as a benchmark for how much to charge consumers on mortgages and other loans. For more on how the rate is set, Renee Montagne talks to Gillian Tett of the Financial Times.

Human Tissue Donation
12:33 am
Thu July 19, 2012

The Seamy Side Of The Human Tissue Business

Michael Mastromarino (center) appeared in a New York City courtroom for sentencing on charges of corruption, body stealing and reckless endangerment, as the mastermind behind a scheme to loot hundreds of corpses and sell bone and tissue for transplants.
Jesse Ward AP

Originally published on Thu July 19, 2012 5:01 am

Part 4 in a four-part series

The human tissue industry has created medical advances for millions of Americans. Tissue taken from cadavers is turned into medical products for the living. A tendon can be used to repair a torn ACL. Veins are used in heart bypass operations. Bone can be turned into plates and screws. They look like something you'd find in a hardware store, but these get used to mend a broken leg. It's a $1 billion-a-year industry that attracts the altruistic, but sometimes the greedy.

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Presidential Race
12:07 am
Thu July 19, 2012

Tax Professionals Scrutinize Mitt Romney's Returns

GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney speaks at a campaign rally in Bowling Green, Ohio, on Wednesday.
J.D. Pooley Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 19, 2012 6:58 am

President Obama's campaign continues to hammer presumptive Republican nominee Mitt Romney over the GOP challenger's refusal to release more of his tax returns. Romney has provided one year's record and promised a second year's worth of returns. But even some of his fellow Republicans now say that's not enough.

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World
12:06 am
Thu July 19, 2012

The Cost Of Women's Rights In Northwest Pakistan

Originally published on Thu July 19, 2012 5:31 pm

Earlier this month, 25-year-old Farida Afridi, who ran an organization that provides information for women about their rights, was gunned down in the street, near the city of Peshawar in northwest Pakistan. No one has been arrested for this killing. In all likelihood no one will be.

On July 4, Afridi was leaving her home to go to her office in Peshawar. What happened next shocked the local community, says Zar Ali Khan, who heads a consortium of activist groups in Peshawar.

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Law
12:04 am
Thu July 19, 2012

Controversial Ariz. Sheriff's Tactics Go On Trial

A trial begins Thursday in Phoenix accusing Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, seen in this May 3, 2010, file photo, of violating the civil rights of Latino citizens and legal U.S. residents.
Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 19, 2012 7:04 am

The self-proclaimed "Toughest Sheriff in America" is facing one of his toughest tests. A trial begins Thursday morning in Phoenix accusing Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio of violating the civil rights of Latino citizens and legal U.S. residents. The class-action civil suit says the sheriff went over the line in his efforts to crack down on illegal immigration.

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Dead Stop
12:03 am
Thu July 19, 2012

A Muslim Cemetery Helps To Ease Funerals' Strain

At the Garden of Peace cemetery in Flint, Mich., Muslims are buried in accordance with traditional Islamic burial rites.
Sami Yenigun NPR

Originally published on Tue July 24, 2012 11:52 am

The Garden of Peace cemetery opened when the Islamic community in Flint, Mich., needed a place to bury their dead in accordance with their religion. After operating for only a couple of years, the cemetery has already welcomed a diverse group of American Muslims.

Tucked in the left corner of an open field, on a breezy, buggy, warm summer morning in Flint, lie parallel rows of identical headstones. There are roughly 30 of them, all facing the same direction.

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Mudslide In Oregon Town
6:47 pm
Wed July 18, 2012

Small Northeast Oregon Town Digs Out From Mud Flow

Tucker Wilson, 14, and his grandfather Philip Berg, take a short break from cleaning mud up off their 120-acre wheat and hay farm near Helix, Ore.
Anna King Northwest Public Radio

Residents of the tiny northeast Oregon town of Helix are cleaning up after a huge mudflow that inundated much of the community.

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Tired Truck Drivers
6:38 pm
Wed July 18, 2012

Oregon, Wash. Truck Inspections Turn Up Weary Drivers

An Oregon Department of Transportation motor carrier enforcement officer weighs a truck as a it passes through a weigh station.
ODOT Flickr

A joint effort in Oregon and Washington to make sure truckers are following safety rules turned up a higher than expected number of weary drivers. More than a quarter of drivers inspected in Oregon were found to be on the road when they shouldn't have been.

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Washington Job Growth
6:33 pm
Wed July 18, 2012

Wash. Gains 10,000 Jobs, But Jobless Rate Still 8.3 Percent

U.S., Washington and Seattle unemployment rates, seasonally adjusted, from June 2007 through June 2012.
U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Washington has gained back more than half the jobs it lost during the Great Recession. The state reached that benchmark last month with the gain of 10,000 new jobs.

Even so, Washington’s unemployment rate remained unchanged in June at 8.3 percent. That’s because the universe of people actively looking for work is also growing.

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New Insect In Idaho
6:28 pm
Wed July 18, 2012

Feds Confirm Mysterious Idaho Bug Is New Pest In U.S.

The elm seed bug made its first appearance in Idaho.
Idaho Department of Agriculture

Federal agriculture officials say the Northwest has the first appearance in the country of an invasive insect known as the “elm seed bug.” The pest was discovered in southern Idaho. It doesn’t pose a threat to crops or livestock. But it could prove to be a major nuisance for homeowners.

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