The Two-Way
11:21 am
Tue August 7, 2012

Barry Bonds Says Without A Doubt He Deserves To Be In Hall Of Fame

Former baseball player Barry Bonds arrives at federal court for sentencing in Dec. 2011. Bonds was convicted of obstructing a government investigation into steroid use among athletes.
Noah Berger AP

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 11:24 am

Barry Bonds will be in the Hall of Fame ballot for the first time this November. Whether he deserves a spot in Cooperstown will no doubt be debated endlessly. One side are those who say you can't take away the 762 home runs that made Bonds the sport's most successful slugger. Others will say that he and others like Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa are forever tarnished because of their connection to performance enhancing drugs.

We'll leave that debate for another day.

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Health Care
11:15 am
Tue August 7, 2012

Prognosis Worsens For Shortage In Primary Care

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 12:40 pm

Transcript

TOM GJELTEN, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Tom Gjelten, in Washington, sitting in for Neal Conan. It's bad enough that a visit to the doctor's office can be expensive. Maybe you worry about the quality of care you'll receive. But that's not all. A common complaint these days is the length of time we have to wait before we see someone who can help us.

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The Record
11:15 am
Tue August 7, 2012

Marvin Hamlisch, Movie And Broadway Composer, Has Died

Marvin Hamlisch (left) with Liza Minnelli and Barry Manilow in 1987.
Time & Life Pictures Time Life Pictures/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 4:22 pm

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Remembrances
10:51 am
Tue August 7, 2012

Fresh Air Remembers Military Historian John Keegan

British military historian John Keegan chronicled the history of warfare from Alexander the Great to the U.S. invasion of Iraq. He died Thursday at age 78.
Jerry Bauer Random House

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 12:03 pm

British military historian John Keegan spent his life studying war, but he never fought in one and described himself as more or less a pacifist. Keegan, who died Thursday at age 78, chronicled the history of warfare from Alexander the Great to the U.S. invasion of Iraq, and was considered one of the foremost military historians of his generation. His books included A History of Warfare and The Face of Battle.

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World
10:41 am
Tue August 7, 2012

What Foreigners Teach Americans About U.S. Culture

Guidebooks help tourists plot journeys and choose which sights to see. The books also provide advice on dining norms, driving habits and punctuality.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed August 8, 2012 10:22 am

When visiting another country for the first time, you probably turn to a guidebook for travel information — recommendations for hotels, restaurants and sightseeing. First-time visitors to the U.S. turn to guidebooks for that information, and also for advice on navigating the complexities of American culture.

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From Our Listeners
10:41 am
Tue August 7, 2012

Letters: Teaching Modern History, Mindfulness

NPR's Tom Gjelten reads from listener comments on several past programs, including teaching modern history, the role of violence in popular culture and how to use mindfulness to re-frame stressful situation.

Middle East
10:41 am
Tue August 7, 2012

Sinai Attack Heightens Threat Of Lawless Region

Originally published on Sun August 12, 2012 6:44 am

Transcript

TOM GJELTEN, HOST:

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National Security
10:41 am
Tue August 7, 2012

The Role Of Government In Cybersecurity

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 11:03 am

The Cyber Security Act of 2012 failed in the Senate, despite growing alarm in the intelligence community about the vulnerabilities of the nation's infrastructure. The episode highlights a unique problem for politicians concerned about the balance between national security and federal regulation.

Author Interviews
10:35 am
Tue August 7, 2012

'Antietam' Dissects Strategies Of North And South

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 11:23 am

In the earliest days of the Civil War, the Union Army focused on cutting off key supply lines on the periphery of the South. The approach was designed to hurt the South's economy and convince its citizens to return to the Union.

Even though President Lincoln said slavery was unjust, in the earliest days of the war he told the Southern states that he wouldn't interfere with slavery as an institution.

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Book Reviews
10:35 am
Tue August 7, 2012

'Dreamland': Open Your Eyes To The Science Of Sleep

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 11:06 am

Step, if you will, into my bedroom at night. (Don't worry, this is a PG-rated invitation.) At first, all is tranquil: My husband and I, exhausted by our day's labors, slumber, comatose, in our double bed. But, somewhere around 2 a.m., things begin to go bump in the night. My husband's body starts twitching, like Frankenstein's monster receiving his first animating shocks of electricity. Thrashing about, he'll kick me and steal the covers. In his dreams, he's always fighting or being chased; one night he said he dreamt Dick Cheney was gaining on him.

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