Japanese Tsunami Debris
4:05 pm
Tue September 4, 2012

Japan Offers To Contribute To Tsunami Debris Cleanup

The Japanese government said it will help pay for the clean up of some debris from the tsunami, such as this refrigerator found on Long Beach on July 5.
Shelly Pollock

For the first time, the Japanese government says it will help to cover some of the cost of cleaning up tsunami debris on American and Canadian shores. Confirmed debris swept to sea by last year's Japanese tsunami began to wash up here this spring.

Read more
Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant
3:58 pm
Tue September 4, 2012

Energy Secretary Investigates Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant

Energy Secretary Steven Chu is personally investigating concerns over Hanford's waste treatment plant.
Dept. of Energy

U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu is at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation this week. Chu’s taking time out of his schedule to personally investigate concerns raised about Hanford’s massive waste treatment plant in southeast Washington.

Read more
Election 2012
3:09 pm
Tue September 4, 2012

Democratic Convention: A Viewer's Guide

Bennett Raglin Getty Images for Macy's

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 10:01 pm

Speakers of interest at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C.

It's All Politics
2:37 pm
Tue September 4, 2012

Some Black Leaders Say Obama's Race A More Nuanced Factor In 2012

Dianne Hart and Marcus Wheeler are both Florida delegates. Said Wheeler, of President Obama: "I would have the same expectation for any president that I have for him."
Liz Halloran NPR

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 3:27 pm

Over the past four years, the presidential narrative has shifted for African-Americans like Louisiana state Rep. Patricia Haynes Smith of Baton Rouge.

"I'm 66 years old," said Smith, at an event Tuesday in Charlotte, N.C., for black state legislators here for the Democratic National Convention. "And before 2008, I didn't think I'd live to see a dream come true."

Read more
The Two-Way
2:32 pm
Tue September 4, 2012

To Some Runners, Zombies Are A Killer Motivator

A runner tries to escape with his life as zombies pursue him during the Run for Your Lives race. The 5K course is littered with obstacles — and the undead.
HGL

Some people run for charity; some run for their health. And some run because it's the only way to escape the ravenous brain-eating zombies who chase them. No, that's not a movie plot. It's essentially the pitch for Run for Your Lives, a "zombie-infested 5K obstacle race" whose popularity has surprised even its organizers.

Read more
It's All Politics
2:31 pm
Tue September 4, 2012

Live Blog: Tuesday At The Democratic National Convention

A general view of the start of Day 1 of the Democratic National Convention at Time Warner Cable Arena on Tuesday.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 9:56 pm

  • NPR Special Coverage, Hour 1
  • NPR Special Coverage, Hour 2
  • NPR Special Coverage, Hour 3

Good evening from Charlotte, N.C., where Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz gaveled the convention to order promptly at 5 p.m. ET. in Charlotte's Time Warner Cable Arena.

Schultz, who is also the chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee, said that throughout the next three days, "we will demonstrate we need to keep President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden four more years."

Read more
Shots - Health Blog
2:06 pm
Tue September 4, 2012

High Blood Pressure: Often Recognized, But Still Poorly Controlled

Knowing your blood pressure is just the beginning.
iStockphoto.com

After decades of encouragement, Americans are getting their blood pressure checked more often.

And there's a little more good news, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Most adults with high blood pressure are being treated these days.

But, and you knew there had to be a but, more than half of all Americans with hypertension — about 36 million people, all told — still haven't got it under control.

Read more
Author Interviews
1:35 pm
Tue September 4, 2012

An Individualist Approach To The Hebrew Bible

Hebrew scripture is a "message in a bottle," says Yoram Hazony, and in The Philosophy of Hebrew Scripture, he tries to decipher that message. Hazony's new book makes the case for a different reading of the ancient texts — and argues that the Hebrew Bible is a work of philosophy in narrative form.

Read more
NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
1:35 pm
Tue September 4, 2012

Bridging The Gap Between Two Neighborhoods

An illustration for a park proposed for Washington's old 11th Street Bridge. If realized, the park would span the Anacostia River, linking the Capitol Hill neighborhood with lower-income Anacostia.
Ed Estes Courtesy of D.C. Office of Planning

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 4:19 pm

Cities around the nation have tried a variety of approaches to revitalizing their urban cores. Some have turned to repurposing old infrastructure to breathe new life into neighborhoods.

One such effort is under way in the nation's capital, where the redevelopment of a bridge linking a wealthy part of the city with a lower-income one may present an opportunity — if an ambitious park plan can be brought to fruition.

A '21st Century Playground'

Read more
Africa
12:34 pm
Tue September 4, 2012

Decades Later, South African Miners Sue Employers

Armstrong Ngutyana (left), 55, and Dumisani Mjolwa, 65, were gold miners during the apartheid era. Both worked underground for nearly three decades. They developed lung disease and were forced to quit their jobs, but received only minimal compensation. They are now part of a class-action lawsuit against South African mining companies.
Anders Kelto for NPR

Originally published on Tue September 4, 2012 1:35 pm

South Africa's mining industry is under heavy scrutiny after 44 people died during protests at a platinum mine near Johannesburg. Now, the industry is facing challenges on another front: Lawyers have filed a class-action lawsuit against three of the country's biggest gold mining companies.

They're suing on behalf of miners who worked during the apartheid era and now have lung disease.

A settlement in the case — and another like it — could reach into the billions of dollars.

Read more

Pages