News

Northwest No Longer Top National Firefighting Priority

6 hours ago
Alan Barbian

The Northwest is no longer the number one firefighting priority in the nation. With cooler temperatures and precipitation this week, fire activity has tapered off some in Oregon and Washington.

Courtney Flatt / NWPR/EarthFix

This summer’s hot, dry weather has left Northwest apple growers hurting for water to irrigate their orchards. It’s a hint at what’s predicted as the climate continues to warm.

A new national study released this week indicates a shift in thinking when it comes to mental health. A majority of those surveyed say they value mental health and physical health equally. But Idaho remains one of the states with a high suicide rate, and low access to mental health care. 

Ashley Ahearn / KUOW/EarthFix

For more than a century, the snowmelt that fed the Dungeness River has provided water for farmers’ crops as well as for salmon journeying to the ocean and back.

It’s a system that’s worked well — except when there’s not enough water to go around. And now that this part of Washington’s Olympic Peninsula is caught up in the drought that’s afflicting much of the West, interest in building a new reservoir is on the rise. 

Seth Book / Skokomish Tribe Department of Natural Resources

Marine life is struggling to survive in the oxygen-starved waters of Hood Canal.

Suppressing Wildfire May Cause More Severe Fires Long-Term, Say Researchers

Aug 31, 2015
Max Whittaker / Reuters

This policy of fire suppression is one the US has followed for over a century. Some scientists, however, are beginning to question this strategy. There is a growing consensus of researchers who believe suppressing forest fires might actually be causing more severe fires, and worsening climate change long-term.

Photos courtesy families of the firefighters.

Family, friends, and fellow firefighters gathered Sunday at a memorial for the three young men who were killed battling a blaze in North Central Washington.

InciWeb

Light rains and higher humidity helped firefighters slow the spread of wildfires burning in North Central Washington on Sunday. More favorable weather is expected this week.

US National Weather Service Spokane Washington

A very bad scenario looks to play out Saturday when it comes to the weather and fires burning in North Central and Northeast Washington.

While the weather forecast looked promising Thursday in calling for rains to hit both regions, the newest prediction could not be worse when it comes to the wildfires.

Meteorologist Andy Brown of the National Weather Service in Spokane is calling for sustained winds of 30 to 40 mph Saturday, with gusts up to 50, and even higher gusts in the mountains.

CREDIT AUSTIN JENKINS / NORTHWEST NEWS NETWORK

Washington Governor Jay Inslee says the fires burning across the state represent a “new normal.” On a tour of the fire lines Thursday, the Democrat reiterated his call for a program to limit carbon emissions.

“So we got to attack this at its source which is carbon pollution. And that’s for another day. Right now we’ve got to put out these fires,” said Inslee.

Pages