Cherries http://nwpr.org en Washington’s Third-Largest Cherry Crop Queued Up This Season http://nwpr.org/post/washington-s-third-largest-cherry-crop-queued-season <p>Northwest sweet cherry growers say this season they'll likely pick their third-largest haul ever. That's 20 million boxes full. But there’s plenty that can happen to cherries even the day of harvest.</p><p> Mon, 12 May 2014 23:23:52 +0000 Anna King 45796 at http://nwpr.org Washington’s Third-Largest Cherry Crop Queued Up This Season Fewer But Bigger Northwest Cherries Expected This Year http://nwpr.org/post/fewer-bigger-northwest-cherries-expected-year <a href="http://cpa.ds.npr.org/northwestnews/audio/2013/05/052713AK_Cherries__web.mp3" class="asset-audio"></a><p>Northwest cold snaps this spring mean not as many cherries this summer. Flower buds and bees don’t like low temperatures. And the cherries don’t like the rain.<p> Fri, 24 May 2013 23:40:03 +0000 Anna King 28132 at http://nwpr.org Fewer But Bigger Northwest Cherries Expected This Year Northwest Farmers, Shop-keeps Wait Anxiously For Cherry Workers http://nwpr.org/post/northwest-farmers-shop-keeps-wait-anxiously-cherry-workers <p>With lingering high unemployment and the endless talk of the down economy &ndash; it&rsquo;s hard to believe that there are some industries putting help-wanted signs out by the dozens. But that&rsquo;s the case in Northwest orchard country where there appears to be a dwindling supply of migrant workers for cherry picking. Cherry season started this past week, and as correspondent Anna King reports, farmers and shop-keeps alike are anxiously waiting for more workers to arrive. Mon, 18 Jun 2012 14:06:33 +0000 Anna King 10186 at http://nwpr.org Northwest Farmers, Shop-keeps Wait Anxiously For Cherry Workers Dreary June Forecast Has Northwest Cherry Farmers A Bit Worried http://nwpr.org/post/dreary-june-forecast-has-northwest-cherry-farmers-bit-worried <p>The Northwest cherry harvest is set to begin next week, but farmers are a bit glum. That&rsquo;s because the National Weather Service says this month&rsquo;s temperatures will be near or below average across Washington, Oregon and Idaho.</p><p>Cool weather and rain and can delay ripening and compress the cherry growing season. That means that markets have less time to sell the perishable fruit. Plus, farmers may have a harder time recruiting enough labor in a shortened season.</p><p>And there&rsquo;s another problem according to the Washington Fruit Commission&#39;s B.J. Thurlby. He says rain can spoil the fruit on the branch. Tue, 05 Jun 2012 01:09:37 +0000 Anna King 9442 at http://nwpr.org Dreary June Forecast Has Northwest Cherry Farmers A Bit Worried