neurology http://nwpr.org en Radiolab: The Language Of Music And The Music Of Language http://nwpr.org/post/radiolab-language-music-and-music-language <p></p><p></p><p>What is music? Why does it move us? How does the brain process sound, and why are some people better at it than others?</p><p>Radiolab posed this question, and seeks to understand the DNA of music - and the connection between music and language.</p><p>In <a href="http://www.radiolab.org/story/91512-musical-language/">a recent episode</a>, Radiolab looked at the disastrous debut of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring in 1913, examined music through modern neurology, and met a composer using computers to decode music and find its essential pieces.</p> Wed, 18 Jun 2014 14:49:17 +0000 Max Bartlett 47659 at http://nwpr.org Radiolab: The Language Of Music And The Music Of Language Forecasting The 'Future' By Tapping Into Human Consciousness http://nwpr.org/post/forecasting-future-tapping-human-consciousness Now more than ever before, we have the tools to study the mysteries of consciousness. Memory, dreams, the self are now being examined using high-tech brain scans developed by physicists on the cutting edge of their field.<p>Dr. Michio Kaku, professor at the City College of New York, is among them. In <em>The Future of the Mind</em>, he gives readers a look at some of the most astonishing research in neuroscience today, and presents a vision of what future innovation might bring. Sun, 23 Feb 2014 00:18:00 +0000 editor 41934 at http://nwpr.org Forecasting The 'Future' By Tapping Into Human Consciousness Book News: Reading And Writing Slow Dementia, Study Says http://nwpr.org/post/book-news-reading-and-writing-slow-dementia-study-says <em>The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.</em><p><ul><p><li>A <a href="http://neurology.org/content/early/2013/07/03/WNL.0b013e31829c5e8a">study</a> published in the scholarly journal <em>Neurology </em>[subscription only] says that, although there is no cure for dementia, "reading, writing, and playing games" can slow the disease's progress. The scientists, led by Robert S. Wilson, asked 294 patients about their reading habits over the course of about 6 years, and then tested their brains for dementia after their deaths. Mon, 08 Jul 2013 11:01:00 +0000 Annalisa Quinn 30565 at http://nwpr.org Oliver Sacks, Exploring How Hallucinations Happen http://nwpr.org/post/oliver-sacks-exploring-how-hallucinations-happen-0 <em>This interview was originally broadcast on <a href="http://www.npr.org/2012/11/06/164360724/oliver-sacks-exploring-how-hallucinations-happen">Nov. Fri, 21 Jun 2013 15:14:00 +0000 editor 29737 at http://nwpr.org Oliver Sacks, Exploring How Hallucinations Happen