Pacific Lamprey eel http://nwpr.org en Swim, Lamprey, Swim! http://nwpr.org/post/swim-lamprey-swim <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">An eel-like fish native to the Northwest can now more easily make it up the Columbia River. Managers at the Columbia’s </span>McNary<span style="line-height: 1.5;"> Dam have installed a new passage system for Pacific lamprey – the first of its kind for the toothy fish.</span></p><p> Mon, 17 Mar 2014 14:02:15 +0000 Courtney Flatt 42905 at http://nwpr.org Swim, Lamprey, Swim! Creating A Northwest Lamprey Hatchery http://nwpr.org/post/creating-northwest-lamprey-hatchery <p></p><p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Pacific lamprey numbers are quickly declining throughout Northwestern waters. Tribal elders remember times when the Columbia River was black with the eel-like fish. Now, Northwest researchers are trying to develop a lamprey hatchery – the first of its kind in the world. But, there are challenges ahead.</span></p><p> Wed, 18 Dec 2013 14:03:55 +0000 Courtney Flatt 38893 at http://nwpr.org Creating A Northwest Lamprey Hatchery How Pacific Lamprey Could Help Nourish Streams http://nwpr.org/post/how-pacific-lamprey-could-help-nourish-streams <p></p><p>Pacific lamprey are toothy eels that were once plentiful in the Northwest. Many considered them trash fish, but they are an important staple to Native American diets and ceremonies.&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 1.5;">Lamprey numbers have greatly declined in the past few decades. Now there is a push to understand more about the eels, so more can be harvested for tribal tables.</span></p><p> Fri, 26 Jul 2013 13:37:18 +0000 Courtney Flatt 31564 at http://nwpr.org How Pacific Lamprey Could Help Nourish Streams