Kevin Maher http://nwpr.org en We're All Completely Alone: A Chat With Novelist Kevin Maher http://nwpr.org/post/were-all-completely-alone-chat-novelist-kevin-maher A father's illness, a girlfriend's mental breakdown and abuse by a priest, all set against a background of class conflict and nationalist tensions: Jim, the 14-year-old protagonist of <em>The Fields, </em>faces catastrophe after catastrophe. But Kevin Maher's debut novel is hardly dour. Instead, the jokes — simultaneously funny and brave — never stop coming.<p>Maher wrote the loosely autobiographical book, set in 1980s Dublin, while he was working as a critic and columnist for <em>The Times </em>in London. Thu, 05 Sep 2013 19:15:00 +0000 Lidia Jean Kott 33710 at http://nwpr.org We're All Completely Alone: A Chat With Novelist Kevin Maher Book News: Scrapbooks Of Hemingway's Childhood Made Public http://nwpr.org/post/book-news-scrapbooks-hemingways-childhood-made-public <em>The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.</em><p><ul><p><li>Although it's hard to imagine Ernest Hemingway as anything other than bearded, gruff and gin-scented, five detailed scrapbooks by the Nobel Prize winner's mother give a glimpse of his early life through baby photos, school reports, drawings and school paper clips. The fragile books compiled by Grace Hall Hemingway had been kept in storage at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston, but digitized versions are now available on the museum's website. Mon, 22 Jul 2013 11:42:00 +0000 editor 31328 at http://nwpr.org Book News: Scrapbooks Of Hemingway's Childhood Made Public A Gut-Punch Of Sadness In James Joyce's 'Dubliners' http://nwpr.org/post/gut-punch-sadness-james-joyces-dubliners <em>Kevin Maher is the author of </em>The Fields, <em>which comes out in the U.S in August.</em><p>I don't know why we did <em>Dubliners</em> when we did. We were 12, some of us going on 13, and the nearest we'd been to highbrow literature were the eye-gouging groans in Shakespeare's <em>Lear</em>, or the hanged puppies and bashed brains in Bronte's <em>Wuthering Heights</em> — both chosen, one suspects in retrospect, to appease the blood thirsty instincts of eager boys on the teenage turn. But <em>Dubliners</em>? Sun, 21 Jul 2013 10:24:00 +0000 Kevin Maher 31404 at http://nwpr.org