Joseph Shapiro http://nwpr.org en Shooting Unfairly Links Violence With Mental Illness — Again http://nwpr.org/post/shooting-unfairly-links-violence-mental-illness-again With the Army's disclosure that Army Spc. Ivan Lopez was being evaluated for post-traumatic stress disorder before he went on a shooting rampage Wednesday, there were once again questions about whether the Army could have prevented the violence at Fort Hood.<p>Experts in mental health say (even as <a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/04/03/298708884/what-do-we-know-about-the-fort-hood-gunman">more facts</a> about Lopez emerge) that it's highly unlikely the violence could have been predicted. Thu, 03 Apr 2014 23:14:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 43854 at http://nwpr.org Shooting Unfairly Links Violence With Mental Illness — Again Mastermind Of 'Body Stealing' Scheme Dies http://nwpr.org/post/mastermind-body-stealing-scheme-dies Dr. Michael Mastromarino died Sunday after battling liver and bone cancer. He was 49.<p>Mastromarino pleaded guilty to "body stealing." In 2008, he was sentenced to up to 58 years in prison.<p>But he continued to insist that he'd been misunderstood. He spoke to NPR, working with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, last year from a prison near Buffalo, N.Y.<p>As soon as we'd clipped on his microphone and before we could even test the recording level, the tall, bald man in a green prison jumpsuit was defending himself. Wed, 10 Jul 2013 19:28:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 30729 at http://nwpr.org Mastermind Of 'Body Stealing' Scheme Dies Amid Dropping Test Scores, Teen Writers' Creativity Soars http://nwpr.org/post/amid-dropping-test-scores-teen-writers-creativity-soars <em>NPR correspondent Joseph Shapiro and his daughter Eva spent the weekend at the </em><a href="http://www.artandwriting.org/">Scholastic Art & Writing Awards</a><em>. Eva, 15, won the "Best in Grade" award, one of two for ninth-grade writers, for a short story. She takes writing classes with Writopia Lab in Washington, D.C.</em><p>To hear recent news reports, you'd wonder if there's a teen left in America who can write a coherent sentence. Thu, 13 Jun 2013 14:58:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro & Eva Shapiro 29287 at http://nwpr.org Turning Up The Heat On Civil Rights-Era Cold Cases http://nwpr.org/post/turning-heat-civil-rights-era-cold-cases Six years ago, the FBI took on a challenge: To review what it called cold-case killings from the civil rights era. The investigation into 112 cases from the 1950s and 1960s is winding down, and civil rights activists are weighing the FBI's efforts.<p>The review comes with word this week of the death of a man who'd been named, <a href="http://www.concordiasentinel.com/news.php?id=5893">by a newspaper investigation</a>, as a possible suspect in one notorious case.<p><strong>The Case</strong><p>The investigation was of the death of Frank Morris, in Ferriday, La., in 1964. Sat, 18 May 2013 09:17:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 27756 at http://nwpr.org Justice In The Segregated South: A New Look At An Old Killing http://nwpr.org/post/justice-segregated-south-new-look-old-killing <em>This story contains language that some may find offensive.</em><p>In the segregated South in 1965, John Queen was about as insignificant as a man could be. He was black, elderly and paralyzed. His legs had been crushed when as a boy he fell off a roof. For the rest of his life, he pulled himself around with his hands.<p>In Fayette, Miss., he would shine shoes on Main Street for a few coins. People called him "Crippled Johnny" or "Shoe-Shine Johnny."<p>"He didn't have legs, so he walked like a rabbit," says Lillie Lee Henderson, Queen's great-niece. Fri, 03 May 2013 20:03:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 26954 at http://nwpr.org Justice In The Segregated South: A New Look At An Old Killing Law Targets Sexual Violence On College Campuses http://nwpr.org/post/law-targets-sexual-violence-college-campuses When President Obama signs an updated version of the <a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2013/02/28/173161650/change-in-law-may-spur-campus-action-on-sexual-assaults">Violence Against Women Act</a> on Thursday afternoon, the law will include new requirements for how colleges and universities handle allegations of sexual assault.<p>Laura Dunn, who's been invited by the White House to attend, plans to be there.<p>In 2010, Dunn <a href="http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=124001493">told her story</a> on <em>Morning Edition</em>: She believed her Wisconsin school failed to p Thu, 07 Mar 2013 00:38:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 23873 at http://nwpr.org Koop Turned Surgeon General's Office Into Mighty Education Platform http://nwpr.org/post/koop-turned-surgeon-generals-office-mighty-education-platform Transcript <p>AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: <p>C. Everett Koop was the most outspoken and some would argue the most influential of all U.S. surgeon generals. [POST-BROADCAST CORRECTION: The correct plural form of the word is surgeons general.] He wore the uniform throughout most of the 1980s, and he turned an office with little power into a mighty platform - to educate Americans about AIDS prevention and the dangers of smoking.<p>C. Everett Koop died today at his home in Hanover, New Hampshire. He was 96. NPR's Joseph Shapiro looks back on his career.<p>JOSEPH SHAPIRO, BYLINE: When C. Mon, 25 Feb 2013 22:32:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 23326 at http://nwpr.org Why A Young Man Died In A Nursing Home, A State Away From His Mom http://nwpr.org/post/why-young-man-died-nursing-home-state-away-his-mom Zach Sayne was 25 when he died earlier this month at the place that had been his home for 15 years — a children's nursing home in Alabama.<p>But that was too far away, 200 miles too far, for his mother in Georgia. Nola Sayne was trying to bring him back, closer to her home. Wed, 16 Jan 2013 18:35:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 21275 at http://nwpr.org Why A Young Man Died In A Nursing Home, A State Away From His Mom Dismissed Case Raises Questions On Shaken Baby Diagnosis http://nwpr.org/post/dismissed-case-raises-questions-shaken-baby-diagnosis When San Francisco prosecutors dismissed charges against Kristian Aspelin in early December, it became just the latest case to raise questions about how shaken baby syndrome is diagnosed. Aspelin, who was accused of causing the death of his infant son, had one thing in his favor: He had enough money to pay for medical experts who cast doubt on the prosecution's theory.<br /> Fri, 21 Dec 2012 20:16:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 20162 at http://nwpr.org Dismissed Case Raises Questions On Shaken Baby Diagnosis Spinal Surgery Company To Give Tissue Proceeds To Charity http://nwpr.org/post/spinal-surgery-company-give-tissue-proceeds-charity When a California company developed a product to be used in spinal fusion surgeries, the firm's president said he knew it faced a new "ethical dilemma," even noting a recent <a href="http://www.npr.org/series/156935894/human-tissue-donation">NPR news investigation</a> questioning the high profits some firms were making from donated human tissue.<p>Spinal Elements, a small and growing company, had long made plates, screws and other technology used in spinal surgeries. Sun, 07 Oct 2012 15:22:00 +0000 Joseph Shapiro 16375 at http://nwpr.org Spinal Surgery Company To Give Tissue Proceeds To Charity